tacit

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tac·it

 (tăs′ĭt)
adj.
1. Not spoken: indicated tacit approval by smiling and winking.
2. Implied by or inferred from actions or statements: Management has given its tacit approval to the plan.
3. Archaic Not speaking; silent.

[Latin tacitus, silent, past participle of tacēre, to be silent.]

tac′it·ly adv.
tac′it·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tacit

(ˈtæsɪt)
adj
1. implied or inferred without direct expression; understood: a tacit agreement.
2. (Law) created or having effect by operation of law, rather than by being directly expressed
[C17: from Latin tacitus, past participle of tacēre to be silent]
ˈtacitly adv
ˈtacitness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tac•it

(ˈtæs ɪt)

adj.
1. understood without being openly expressed; implied: tacit approval.
2. silent; saying nothing: a tacit partner.
3. unvoiced or unspoken: a tacit prayer.
[1595–1605; < Latin tacitus silent, past participle of tacēre to be silent]
tac′it•ly, adv.
tac′it•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
tacenda, tacit - Tacenda are things not to be mentioned or made public—things better left unsaid; tacit means "unspoken, silent" or "implied, inferred."
See also related terms for implied.

tacit

- One of its early meanings was "wordless, noiseless," from Latin tacere, "be silent."
See also related terms for silent.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tacit - implied by or inferred from actions or statements; "gave silent consent"; "a tacit agreement"; "the understood provisos of a custody agreement"
implicit, inexplicit - implied though not directly expressed; inherent in the nature of something; "an implicit agreement not to raise the subject"; "there was implicit criticism in his voice"; "anger was implicit in the argument"; "the oak is implicit in the acorn"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

tacit

adjective implied, understood, implicit, silent, taken for granted, unspoken, inferred, undeclared, wordless, unstated, unexpressed a tacit admission that a mistake had been made
stated, spoken, explicit, expressed, spelled-out
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

tacit

adjective
2. Conveyed indirectly without words or speech:
Idiom: taken for granted.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
äänetönhiljainen
non-verbaalstilzwijgend

tacit

[ˈtæsɪt] ADJtácito
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tacit

[ˈtæsɪt] adjtacite
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tacit

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

tacit

[ˈtæsɪt] adjtacito/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Learning and innovation in international strategic alliances: An empirical test of the role of trust and tacitness. Journal of Management Studies, 46(6), 1031-1056.
"Tacit knowledge and the economic geography of context, or the undefinable tacitness of being (there)".
Sexuality communication between Latinx parents and heterosexual children has been described as vague, directive, and marked by secrecy and tacitness (Perez and Pinzon 1997).
Since opportunities are the result of information asymmetries, there is always a degree of tacitness and Entrepreneurial Specific Human Capital (ESC) gained through experience and this plays a significant role in understanding the requirements of tacit opportunities (Smith et al., 2009).
After all, the tacitness of knowledge tends to diminish over time as pathbreaking innovations become accepted conventions.
Such weakness in the legal protection regime is instead (somewhat) compensated by their high degree of idiosyncrasy, their complex character (Rivkin, 2000), the high degree of tacitness regarding the knowledge usually involved (Lam, 2000), and the difficulties involved in their external observation (Alange et al., 1998).
Simonin (1999) narrowed this research to the antecedents of the ambiguity of knowledge, which included tacitness, specificity, and complexity, and found that ambiguity had a negative effect on knowledge transfer and integration.
Second, corporate theft of ideas is often constrained by the tacitness of technical knowledge, particularly where knowledge is carried in groups, as is typical in manufacturing (Kogut and Zander 1992).
Gupta and Govindarajan (2000), Perez-Nordtvedt, Kedia, Datta and Rashee (2008) and Tseng (2015), to cite a few, consider as factors influencing the degree of knowledge (a) flows from the sender (source unit), (b) to the receiver (target unit), (c) the transmission per se (formal and informal mechanisms) and (d) the knowledge characteristics (mainly complexity and tacitness).