tacrine


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Related to tacrine: Rivastigmine, Galantamine, Metrifonate

tac·rine

 (tăk′rēn, -rĭn)
n.
A drug, C13H14N2, used in its hydrochloride form to treat memory loss and other cognitive deficits in people with Alzheimer's disease.

[t(etrahydro)- (tetra- + hydro-) + acr(id)ine.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tacrine

(ˈtækriːn)
n
(Pharmacology) pharmacol a drug prescribed to patients of Alzheimer's disease
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

tacrine

n tacrina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
* Tacrine (Cognex[R]): Unlike donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine, this drug prevents breakdown of acetylcholine in the body as well as the brain, which may help with earlier- and mid-stage Alzheimer cases.
Both lack the potential liver toxicity and four-times-a-day dosing that have virtually eliminated tacrine's use.
Tacrine (Cognex) is used to prevent the breakdown of ACh and, thereby, improve cognitive function in AD patients.[20] Donepezil (Aricept) is another drug used to preserve available amounts of ACh, which facilitates cognitive functions.[20] These benefits support the notion that a deficiency in ACh causes the cognitive problems related to AD.
Tacrine (Cognex) and donepezil (Aricept) are the only two acetylcholinesterase inhibitors available in the United States.
Since the drug's approval, the need for weekly liver function tests has likely made some physicians reluctant to prescribe Cognex (tacrine hydrochloride) for their patients with Alzheimer's disease.
CYP1A2 plays an important role in the metabolism of several clinically used drugs, including theophylline, clozapine and tacrine, and foodborne procarcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or imidazoquinoline derivatives (Faber et al.
Compound Docking scores (kcal x [mol.sup.-1]) Trichlorfon -5.7 Echothiophate -5.9 Isoflurophate -5.9 Pyridostigmine -6.3 Neostigmine -7.5 Parathion -7.6 Rivastigmine -7.9 Tacrine -8.8 Ladostigil -9.1 Physostigmine -9.1 Huperzine A -9.7 Ungeremine -10 Galantamine -10.2 Donepezil -12.1 2 -9.1 3 -9.4 6 -7.8 7 -5.7 8 -7.6 9 -7.9 14 -10
A new drug called tacrine (which is sold under the brand name Cognex) slows deterioration, but only modestly, only in some patients, and only for six months or so.
One of the most innovative and often discussed pharmaceutical introductions in 1993 was tacrine HCI, Parke-Davis' treatment for mild to modedrate dementia resulting from Alzheimer's disease.
Huperzine A, like the drug tacrine (THA), prevents acetylcholinesterase from breaking down this essential chemical, thus raising levels of acetylcholine in the brain and improving memory.