taiaha


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taiaha

(ˈtaɪəˌhɑː)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) NZ a carved weapon in the form of a staff, now used in Māori ceremonial oratory
[Māori]
References in periodicals archive ?
i Tahu which saw 250 rangatahi take part in activities such as taiaha wananga, coding workshops, and outdoor pursuits.
The third one went out as if holding a taiaha (long carved war weapon) and doing the appropriate haka steps that accompany this weapon, picked up the third koha envelope
Although participants did not speak about the use of equipment such as poi or taiaha (A long weapon of hard wood with one end carved), consideration of tool use outside the kapa haka environment may be advantageous.
But I wasn't walking around in a kilt brandishing a claymore (sword) and they weren't walking around wearing piupiu, swinging a taiaha (club).
Hidden, she watches as the boys learn to use the taiaha, an ancient weapon of war.
He was enormous and dusty, a towering seven metres of plaster, a shirtless, graffitied man, left hand clasping a taiaha, right resting on a rock.
Perhaps what Evans was shaking his rhetorical taiaha (speaking staff) at may be the topics selected by New Zealand psychologists for investigation rather than the scientific methods they use.
Keown points out (12) that the traditional method of fighting with the taiaha which Tu had learnt from his uncle gives him skill with the bayonet (173-74), while on one occasion two chiefs, fellow soldiers, 'draw olden-day patterns of chiefly moko on each other's skins' (190), and then terrify a Spandau gunner with haka-like movements, leaping into the air and protruding their tongues (191).
Making a set of equipment such as tirakau (used in stick games), taiaha and patu (traditional weapons) not only provided knowledge about the items, but was also an opportunity to learn about local natural resources and the environment.
In addition, the poem deploys several words from the Maori language that are likely to be known not only to fluent Maori language speakers but also to many primarily English language speakers in Aotearoa/New Zealand, including tekoteko, Ngati, marae, taiaha, and, most prominently, the repeated formulaic phrase 'Tihei Mauriora'.