tailoress


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tailoress

(ˈteɪlərɪs)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a female tailor
References in classic literature ?
When I ask for a garment of a particular form, my tailoress tells me gravely, "They do not make them so now," not emphasizing the "They" at all, as if she quoted an authority as impersonal as the Fates, and I find it difficult to get made what I want, simply because she cannot believe that I mean what I say, that I am so rash.
Now, the old aristocratic edifice hides its time-worn visage behind an upstart modern building; at one of the back windows I observed some pretty tailoresses, sewing and chatting and laughing, with now and then a careless glance towards the balcony.
She married Ken Iball in 1954 and trained as a tailoress and worked in several Chester shops including Browns of Chester and Theresa Ryan (on Werbugh Street).
Elizabeth, 75, a former tailoress, was keen on dancing in her younger days.
His wife, a retired tailoress, recalled that the 1958 wedding cost around PS50 in total which was quite a sum.
Mary Ann Hancox, a tailoress of Kimberley Road, Cardiff, was another to join the Women's Royal Air Force.
Ann is a qualified tailoress and offers a full alteration service, if needed.
It's one of those statements that make you pause as Thoreau does when, in Walden, he enters a shop in Concord to have a coat made in a certain cut and fabric and the tailoress tells him, "They do not make them so now." It leaves him "absorbed in thought, emphasizing each word separately that I may come at the meaning of it." You feel the same way when hearing this solemn declaration that every history is important.
The word "Kipper" is in fact an old industry term from London's 19th century Savile Row and refers to a female tailor or tailoress. These working women went jobbing in pairs to avoid unwanted advances from men.
Mr Jones said his father had worked as a haulage driver in a local mine, and later as an electrician in the steelworks at Port Talbot, while his mother had been a tailoress.
The retired accountant, who will carry an exact replica of the musket Matthew used that day, added: "I am looking forward to being at Waterloo and have had my redcoat tunic made by a professional tailoress who specialises in period costume.
"I've been a weaver and a winder, a dressmaker and a tailoress. I've got cancer.