tailwind

(redirected from tailwinds)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

tail·wind

or tail wind  (tāl′wĭnd′)
n.
1. A wind blowing in the same direction as that of the course of an aircraft, ship, or other vehicle.
2. tailwinds Informal Favorable economic conditions: a company experiencing tailwinds from increased consumer demand.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tailwind

(ˈteɪlˌwɪnd)
n
a wind blowing in the same direction as the course of an aircraft or ship. Compare headwind
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tail•wind

(ˈteɪlˌwɪnd)

n.
a wind from directly behind a moving object (opposed to headwind).
[1895–1900]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tailwind - wind blowing in the same direction as the path of a ship or aircraft
air current, current of air, wind - air moving (sometimes with considerable force) from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure; "trees bent under the fierce winds"; "when there is no wind, row"; "the radioactivity was being swept upwards by the air current and out into the atmosphere"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

tailwind

[ˈteɪlwɪnd] Nviento m de cola
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tailwind

[ˈteɪlwɪnd] nvent m arrière inv
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tailwind

[ˈteɪlˌwɪnd] nvento in coda
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Related Link: Pure Storage Faces Near-Term Pressures, But Has Long-Term Tailwinds, Says Bullish BofA
Morgan Stanley analyst James Faucette said Cisco's business remained "remarkably resilient" over last year, but the tailwinds that have been helping are beginning to anniversary while its headwinds pick up.
The paper exercise of calculating the effect of tailwinds on landing and takeoff distances is usually enough to convince pilots to avoid them.
Four tailwinds are expected to help the Egyptian economy recover in 2018, according to analysis conducted by Ziad Daoud, Chief Middle East Economist, Bloomberg Economics.
Four tailwinds are expected to help the Egyptian economy recover in 2018, said a top economy, highlighting that the country's growth is expected to accelerate to 5.5 per cent in 2018 and 2019.
It wasn't too long ago; say 2-3 years ago, that these terms were not used in everyday business to describe where we are; where we're going; what limits presses upon us in achieving our business goals: analytics, guardrails, highways, headwinds, tailwinds, bandwidth, dashboards and mobility.
In India, riding on the tailwinds of global cues and domestic buying, gold prices covered up by Rs 160 to Rs 28,760 per 10 grams today.
"On a reported basis we expect to see an acceleration in sales in the US and EU, with currency tailwinds supporting top-line momentum," Mr Mensah said.
Officials said the route would be a win- win situation for both the airline and passengers as it would save crores of rupees in fuel costs and also reduce the flying time by up to three hours in winter and by an hour or so in summer when the tailwinds are weaker.
On an IMC day, tailwinds can be, well, interesting.
Despite the high penetration of state medical facilities, the client satisfaction level is low, while the government is creating tailwinds to private providers.