cognizance

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cog·ni·zance

 (kŏg′nĭ-zəns)
n.
1. Conscious knowledge or recognition; awareness.
2. The range of what one can know or understand.
3. Observance; notice: We will take cognizance of your objections at the proper time.
4. Law Acknowledgment, recognition, or jurisdiction; the assumption of jurisdiction in a case.
5. Heraldry A crest or badge worn to distinguish the bearer.

[Middle English conissaunce, from Old French conoissance, from connoistre, to know, from Latin cognōscere, to learn; see cognition.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cognizance

(ˈkɒɡnɪzəns; ˈkɒnɪ-) or

cognisance

n
1. knowledge; acknowledgment
2. take cognizance of to take notice of; acknowledge, esp officially
3. the range or scope of knowledge or perception
4. (Law) law
a. the right of a court to hear and determine a cause or matter
b. knowledge of certain facts upon which the court must act without requiring proof
c. chiefly US confession
5. (Heraldry) heraldry a distinguishing badge or bearing
[C14: from Old French conoissance, from conoistre to know, from Latin cognōscere to learn; see cognition]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cog•ni•zance

(ˈkɒg nə zəns, ˈkɒn ə-)

n.
1. awareness or realization; notice: to take cognizance of a slighting remark.
2.
a. judicial notice as taken by a court in dealing with a cause.
b. the right of taking jurisdiction, as possessed by a court.
3. the range or scope of a person's knowledge, observation, etc.: Such perceptions are beyond my cognizance.
4. a heraldic emblem serving as an identifying mark.
[1250–1300; Middle English conisa(u)nce < Middle French con(o)is(s)ance <conois(tre) to know < Latin cognōscere cognition]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cognizance

- Latin gnoscene, "know," begat cognoscere, "get to know; recognize," and it moved through French connoissance to English to become cognizance.
See also related terms for recognize.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cognizance - having knowledge of; "he had no awareness of his mistakes"; "his sudden consciousness of the problem he faced"; "their intelligence and general knowingness was impressive"
self-awareness - awareness of your own individuality
feel - an intuitive awareness; "he has a feel for animals" or "it's easy when you get the feel of it";
sense - a general conscious awareness; "a sense of security"; "a sense of happiness"; "a sense of danger"; "a sense of self"
knowing - a clear and certain mental apprehension
incognizance - a lack of knowledge or recognition
2.cognizance - range of what one can know or understand; "beyond my ken"
knowing - a clear and certain mental apprehension
3.cognizance - range or scope of what is perceived
perception - knowledge gained by perceiving; "a man admired for the depth of his perception"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

cognizance

noun
1. The condition of being aware:
2. The act of noting, observing, or taking into account:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

cognizance

[ˈkɒgnɪzəns] Nconocimiento m
to be within one's cognizanceser de la competencia de uno
to take cognizance oftener en cuenta
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

cognizance

[ˈkɒgnɪzəns] cognisance (British) n (formal)
to take cognizance of sth (= acknowledge) → prendre connaissance de qch
(= knowledge) → connaissance f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

cognizance

n (form)
(= conscious knowledge, awareness)Kenntnis f; (= range of perception)Erkenntnisbereich m; to take cognizance of somethingetw zur Kenntnis nehmen
(= jurisdiction)Zuständigkeit f, → Befugnis f; (Jur) → Gerichtsbarkeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

cognizance

cognisance [ˈkɒgnɪzəns] n (frm) → conoscenza
to take cognisance of sth → tener conto di qc
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Nor was he less blamable for the manner in which he constituted the ephori; for these magistrates take cognisance of things of the last importance, and yet they are chosen out of the people in general; so that it often happens that a very poor person is elected to that office, who, from that circumstance, is easily bought.
The old man told me he had not been in the Brazils for about nine years; but that he could assure me that when he came away my partner was living, but the trustees whom I had joined with him to take cognisance of my part were both dead: that, however, he believed I would have a very good account of the improvement of the plantation; for that, upon the general belief of my being cast away and drowned, my trustees had given in the account of the produce of my part of the plantation to the procurator-fiscal, who had appropriated it, in case I never came to claim it, one-third to the king, and two-thirds to the monastery of St.
Crime, which, under certain conditions, may seem to have created Individualism, must take cognisance of other people and interfere with them.