take the stand

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Related to take the stand: Pertaining to
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.take the stand - give testimony in a court of lawtake the stand - give testimony in a court of law  
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
declare - state emphatically and authoritatively; "He declared that he needed more money to carry out the task he was charged with"
vouch - give personal assurance; guarantee; "Will he vouch for me?"
يَقِف في كُشْك الشّاهِد
zaujmout místo ve svědecké lavici
tanúvallomást tesz
tanıklık yapmak


(stӕnd) past tense, past participle stood (stud) verb
1. to be in an upright position, not sitting or lying. His leg was so painful that he could hardly stand; After the storm, few trees were left standing.
2. (often with up) to rise to the feet. He pushed back his chair and stood up; Some people like to stand (up) when the National Anthem is played.
3. to remain motionless. The train stood for an hour outside Newcastle.
4. to remain unchanged. This law still stands.
5. to be in or have a particular place. There is now a factory where our house once stood.
6. to be in a particular state, condition or situation. As matters stand, we can do nothing to help; How do you stand financially?
7. to accept or offer oneself for a particular position etc. He is standing as Parliamentary candidate for our district.
8. to put in a particular position, especially upright. He picked up the fallen chair and stood it beside the table.
9. to undergo or endure. He will stand (his) trial for murder; I can't stand her rudeness any longer.
10. to pay for (a meal etc) for (a person). Let me stand you a drink!
1. a position or place in which to stand ready to fight etc, or an act of fighting etc. The guard took up his stand at the gate; I shall make a stand for what I believe is right.
2. an object, especially a piece of furniture, for holding or supporting something. a coat-stand; The sculpture had been removed from its stand for cleaning.
3. a stall where goods are displayed for sale or advertisement.
4. a large structure beside a football pitch, race course etc with rows of seats for spectators. The stand was crowded.
5. (American) a witness box in a law court.
take the stand
to come and sit in the witness box in order to testify. The witness was asked to take the stand.
ˈstanding adjective
permanent. The general's standing orders must be obeyed.
1. time of lasting. an agreement of long standing.
2. rank or reputation. a diplomat of high standing.
ˈstand-byplural ˈstand-bys noun
1. readiness for action. Two fire-engines went directly to the fire, and a third was on stand-by (= ready to go if ordered).
2. something that can be used in an emergency etc. Fruit is a good stand-by when children get hungry between meals.
(of an airline passenger or ticket) costing or paying less than the usual fare, as the passenger does not book a seat for a particular flight, but waits for the first available seat.
travelling in this way. It costs a lot less to travel stand-by.
ˈstand-in noun
a person who takes someone else's job etc for a temporary period, especially in making films.
ˈstanding-room noun
space for standing only, not sitting. There was standing-room only on the bus.
make someone's hair stand on end
to frighten someone very greatly. The horrible scream made his hair stand on end.
stand aside
to move to one side or withdraw out of someone's way. He stood aside to let me pass.
stand back
to move backwards or away. A crowd gathered round the injured man, but a policeman ordered everyone to stand back.
stand by
1. to watch something happening without doing anything. I couldn't just stand by while he was hitting the child.
2. to be ready to act. The police are standing by in case of trouble.
3. to support; to stay loyal to. She stood by him throughout his trial.
stand down
to withdraw eg from a contest.
stand fast/firm
to refuse to yield.
stand for
1. to be a candidate for election to. He stood for Parliament.
2. to be an abbreviation for. HQ stands for Headquarters.
3. to represent. I like to think that our school stands for all that is best in education.
4. to tolerate. I won't stand for this sort of behaviour.
stand in
to take another person's place, job etc for a time. The leading actor was ill and another actor stood in for him.
stand on one's own (two) feet
to manage one's own affairs without help.
stand out
1. to be noticeable. She stood out as one of the prettiest girls in the school.
2. to go on resisting or to refuse to yield. The garrison stood out (against the besieging army) as long as possible.
stand over
to supervise closely. I have to stand over him to make him do his schoolwork.
stand up for
to support or defend. She stood up for him when the others bullied him.
stand up to
to show resistance to. He stood up to the bigger boys who tried to bully him; These chairs have stood up to very hard use.
References in periodicals archive ?
We object to these witnesses taking the stand because they read the case files before they were summoned to take the stand," argued attorney Abdulrahman Al Ghanaim.
The main difference was that he testified this time and didn't take the stand last time,'' Chasworth said.

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