talking drum


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talking drum

n.
A small West African drum, played with a curved stick and having a membrane stretched over one end or both ends of a narrow-waisted wooden frame by cords whose tension can be manually altered to vary the drum's tonality as it is played. Also called dundun.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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Lady drummer, Ayanfola and her 15-person ensemble, serenaded the audience with delightful tunes from the talking drum (gangan).
The presence of speech surrogates, such as the talking drum (dimduri), indicate that language and music have long had a close relationship in Yoruba-speaking areas.
Started in 1976 by Carol Seajay (co-founder of Old Wives' Tales bookstore in San Francisco), the publication served as a treasured "talking drum" as economics, technology and sociocultural shifts forced feminist bookstore owners to develop strategies to remain profitable and politically relevant.
The Akarima literally means the one who beats the drum and according to Locke (2002) he plays the timpana drum also called the talking drum (see Figure.
They specialized in the Talking drum, Bata drums as well as other Yoruba drums.
Besides the balafon, other instruments played include acoustic guitar, tama (talking drum), djembe/banjo electric bass guitar.
The last stage of the construction is when the membrane is tendered, to achieve the three main tones of the talking drum. This is done by placing the drum in the sun and by beating the membrane without manipulating the thongs, in order to generate the high, medium and low tones.
"We have the talking drum which is used to pass a message.
Musa also assisted the children to play the various African drums including the Talking Drum, Lamba, Bombom and Kungu.
The term 'talking drum' is usually given to an hourglass-shaped instrument played with a bent stick.
The author begins his history with the African Talking Drum to return the reader to a time even before the creation of writing.
Drum player Ayan De First said: "It was his first time to have the opportunity to play the talking drum, and I think he loved it.