tamarind


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tam·a·rind

 (tăm′ə-rĭnd′)
n.
1. A tropical evergreen tree (Tamarindus indica) of the pea family, native to Africa and widely cultivated as an ornamental and for its pods, which contain small seeds embedded in a sticky edible pulp.
2.
a. The fruit of this tree.
b. Syrup prepared from the pulp of this fruit.

[Middle English tamarinde, ultimately (via Medieval Latin tamarindus and Old French tamarinde) from Arabic tamr hindī, tamarind (literally, "Indian dates," tamarind being so called because medieval Arabian merchants imported it from India) : tamr, dates; see tmr in Semitic roots + hindī, of India (from Hind, India, from Persian; see Hindi).]

tamarind

(ˈtæmərɪnd)
n
1. (Plants) a leguminous tropical evergreen tree, Tamarindus indica, having pale yellow red-streaked flowers and brown pulpy pods, each surrounded by a brittle shell
2. (Plants) the acid fruit of this tree, used as a food and to make beverages and medicines
3. (Forestry) the wood of this tree
[C16: from Medieval Latin tamarindus, ultimately from Arabic tamr hindī Indian date, from tamr date + hindī Indian, from Hind India]

tam•a•rind

(ˈtæm ə rɪnd)

n.
1. the pod of a large tropical tree, Tamarindus indica, of the legume family, containing seeds in a juicy acid pulp used in beverages and food.
2. the tree itself.
[1525–35; < Medieval Latin tamarindus « Arabic tamr hindī literally, Indian date]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tamarind - long-lived tropical evergreen tree with a spreading crown and feathery evergreen foliage and fragrant flowers yielding hard yellowish wood and long pods with edible chocolate-colored acidic pulptamarind - long-lived tropical evergreen tree with a spreading crown and feathery evergreen foliage and fragrant flowers yielding hard yellowish wood and long pods with edible chocolate-colored acidic pulp
tamarind, tamarindo - large tropical seed pod with very tangy pulp that is eaten fresh or cooked with rice and fish or preserved for curries and chutneys
genus Tamarindus, Tamarindus - widely cultivated tropical trees originally of Africa
bean tree - any of several trees having seedpods as fruits
2.tamarind - large tropical seed pod with very tangy pulp that is eaten fresh or cooked with rice and fish or preserved for curries and chutneys
edible fruit - edible reproductive body of a seed plant especially one having sweet flesh
tamarind, tamarind tree, tamarindo, Tamarindus indica - long-lived tropical evergreen tree with a spreading crown and feathery evergreen foliage and fragrant flowers yielding hard yellowish wood and long pods with edible chocolate-colored acidic pulp
Translations
شَجرَة تَمْر هِنْدي
tamarind
tamarinde
tamarindusfa gyümölcse
tamarind
tamarindas
tamarinds
tamarind
demirhindi

tamarind

[ˈtæmərɪnd] Ntamarindo m

tamarind

[ˈtæmərɪnd] ntamarin m

tamarind

n (= tree, fruit)Tamarinde f

tamarind

[ˈtæmərɪnd] ntamarindo

tamarind

(ˈtӕmərind) noun
a tropical fruit, a brown pod with a juicy, spicy pulp used in medicines, drinks etc.
References in classic literature ?
Hast thous not torn the Naiad from her flood, The Elfin from the green grass, and from me The summer dream beneath the tamarind tree?
Various water-courses filter through, toward the east, and work their way onward to flow into the Kingani, in the midst of gigantic clumps of sycamore, tamarind, calabash, and palmyra trees.
But she filled it, none the less, with good, steaming vegetable curry, clapped a fried cake atop, and a morsel of clarified butter on the cake, dabbed a lump of sour tamarind conserve at the side; and Kim looked at the load lovingly.
Send me word by telegraph whether you would like Truffles again, or whether you would prefer something simpler and lighter--say that incomparable French dish, Pig's Eyelids and Tamarinds. Believe me always your ally and admirer, your poet and cook--DEXTER."
Principal productions are porcelain, tea, cinnamon, shawls, tin, tamarinds and opium.
It was a dense thicket, in which rose huge cypresses, sycamores, tulip-trees, olives, tamarinds, oaks, and magnolias.
The upper slide, on being pulled down (leaving the lower a double mystery), revealed deep shelves of pickle-jars, jam- pots, tin canisters, spice-boxes, and agreeably outlandish vessels of blue and white, the luscious lodgings of preserved tamarinds and ginger.
He would abstract lozenges, tamarinds, and other produce from the surgery-drawers for little Georgy's benefit, and compounded draughts and mixtures for him of miraculous sweetness, so that it was quite a pleasure to the child to be ailing.
He says the recipes are easy to follow and the coco tamarind fried wings combine Carew has up some ideas on savoury and sticky flavours and textures to create a tasty dish full of Asian notes.
Since the Kengeles brand merged with the Tamarind Group with Gavin Bell now one of the directors there has been much more emphasis on the quality of the food.
Isha Sesay, the author of Beneath the Tamarind Tree, is a Cambridge University-educated, Peabody Award-winning former anchor for CNN.
'Imli' (Tamarind) contains many volatile phytochemicals such as limonene, geraniol, safrole, cinnamic acid, methyl salicylate, pyrazine and alkylthiazoles.