tamarisk


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tam·a·risk

 (tăm′ə-rĭsk′)
n.
Any of numerous shrubs or small trees of the genus Tamarix, native to Africa and Eurasia and widely naturalized in western North America, having small scalelike leaves and racemes of small pinkish flowers and usually growing in saline soil. Also called salt cedar.

[Middle English tamarisc, from Late Latin tamariscus, variant of Latin tamarīx, tamarīc-; probably from an unknown Mediterranean source akin to Greek murikē.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tamarisk

(ˈtæmərɪsk)
n
(Plants) any of various ornamental trees and shrubs of the genus Tamarix, of the Mediterranean region and S and SE Asia, having scalelike leaves, slender branches, and feathery clusters of pink or whitish flowers: family Tamaricaceae
[C15: from Late Latin tamariscus, from Latin tamarix]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tam•a•risk

(ˈtæm ə rɪsk)

n.
any of several small trees or shrubs of the genus Tamarix, and family Tamaricaceae, having slender branches bearing small leaves and feathery flower clusters.
[1350–1400; Middle English tamariscus < Late Latin, variant of Latin tamarix, perhaps < an African source]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tamarisk - any shrub or small tree of the genus Tamarix having small scalelike or needle-shaped leaves and feathery racemes of small white or pinkish flowerstamarisk - any shrub or small tree of the genus Tamarix having small scalelike or needle-shaped leaves and feathery racemes of small white or pinkish flowers; of mostly coastal areas with saline soil
genus Tamarix, Tamarix - genus of deciduous shrubs or small trees of eastern Mediterranean regions and tropical Asia
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

tamarisk

[ˈtæmərɪsk] Ntamarisco m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tamarisk

[ˈtæmərɪsk] ntamaris m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tamarisk

nTamariske f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

tamarisk

[ˈtæmərɪsk] ntamerice f, tamarisco
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Then Menelaus of the loud war-cry took Adrestus alive, for his horses ran into a tamarisk bush, as they were flying wildly over the plain, and broke the pole from the car; they went on towards the city along with the others in full flight, but Adrestus rolled out, and fell in the dust flat on his face by the wheel of his chariot; Menelaus came up to him spear in hand, but Adrestus caught him by the knees begging for his life.
There was a place close to the wall all grown about with tamarisk trees, where I knew Garm kept his bones.
They had not gone half a mile farther when they heard Ko, the Crow, singing the death-song in the top of a tamarisk under whose shade three men were lying.
Then he wove sandals with wicker-work by the sand of the sea, wonderful things, unthought of, unimagined; for he mixed together tamarisk and myrtle-twigs, fastening together an armful of their fresh, young wood, and tied them, leaves and all securely under his feet as light sandals.
The river's new flow regime and decades of damage to soils from cattle and off-road vehicle use favored the spread of an exotic tree species called tamarisk, also known as saltcedar.
The huge walls and internal and external ceilings are built with tamarisk and palm tree fronds.
Among the plants are tamarisk, Christ's thorn, palms, Punica granatum (pomegranates), grapes, figs, olives, basil, eucalyptus, ginger, Acacia tortilis, Buxus dioica, Salvadora persica and Lawsonia inermis.
Roberts and other city officials, promised&nbsp;they will be removing the tamarisk trees and a chain link fence along the Crossley Tract (the African-American neighborhood) borders as quickly as possible.&nbsp;
Two decades later, these processes had significantly reduced the wetland and riparian habitat and created conditions favorable for the invasive tamarisk (Tamarix).
A third time, Abraham planted a tamarisk at Beer-sheba, and invoked there the name of the Lord (Gen.
But Exodus also says that the manna melted when the sun was up, so some scholars identify it as the resin from the tamarisk tree (Tamarix gallica).