tamarisk


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tam·a·risk

 (tăm′ə-rĭsk′)
n.
Any of numerous shrubs or small trees of the genus Tamarix, native to Africa and Eurasia and widely naturalized in western North America, having small scalelike leaves and racemes of small pinkish flowers and usually growing in saline soil. Also called salt cedar.

[Middle English tamarisc, from Late Latin tamariscus, variant of Latin tamarīx, tamarīc-; probably from an unknown Mediterranean source akin to Greek murikē.]

tamarisk

(ˈtæmərɪsk)
n
(Plants) any of various ornamental trees and shrubs of the genus Tamarix, of the Mediterranean region and S and SE Asia, having scalelike leaves, slender branches, and feathery clusters of pink or whitish flowers: family Tamaricaceae
[C15: from Late Latin tamariscus, from Latin tamarix]

tam•a•risk

(ˈtæm ə rɪsk)

n.
any of several small trees or shrubs of the genus Tamarix, and family Tamaricaceae, having slender branches bearing small leaves and feathery flower clusters.
[1350–1400; Middle English tamariscus < Late Latin, variant of Latin tamarix, perhaps < an African source]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tamarisk - any shrub or small tree of the genus Tamarix having small scalelike or needle-shaped leaves and feathery racemes of small white or pinkish flowerstamarisk - any shrub or small tree of the genus Tamarix having small scalelike or needle-shaped leaves and feathery racemes of small white or pinkish flowers; of mostly coastal areas with saline soil
genus Tamarix, Tamarix - genus of deciduous shrubs or small trees of eastern Mediterranean regions and tropical Asia
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
Translations

tamarisk

[ˈtæmərɪsk] Ntamarisco m

tamarisk

[ˈtæmərɪsk] ntamaris m

tamarisk

nTamariske f

tamarisk

[ˈtæmərɪsk] ntamerice f, tamarisco
References in classic literature ?
Then Menelaus of the loud war-cry took Adrestus alive, for his horses ran into a tamarisk bush, as they were flying wildly over the plain, and broke the pole from the car; they went on towards the city along with the others in full flight, but Adrestus rolled out, and fell in the dust flat on his face by the wheel of his chariot; Menelaus came up to him spear in hand, but Adrestus caught him by the knees begging for his life.
There was a place close to the wall all grown about with tamarisk trees, where I knew Garm kept his bones.
They had not gone half a mile farther when they heard Ko, the Crow, singing the death-song in the top of a tamarisk under whose shade three men were lying.
Then he wove sandals with wicker-work by the sand of the sea, wonderful things, unthought of, unimagined; for he mixed together tamarisk and myrtle-twigs, fastening together an armful of their fresh, young wood, and tied them, leaves and all securely under his feet as light sandals.
The Western Colorado Conservation Corps in partnerships with the Bureau of Reclamation, Colorado State Forest Service and Tamarisk Coalition, are collaborating to improve 20 acres of habitat at Reclamations Grand Junction Wildlife Area, located near the confluence of the Gunnison and Colorado Rivers near downtown Grand Junction, Colorado.
Two decades later, these processes had significantly reduced the wetland and riparian habitat and created conditions favorable for the invasive tamarisk (Tamarix).
Tamarisk Investments, a newly established Dubai-based investment boutique, announces the underwriting of an investment by Willow Impact Investors in the Kenyan based Bio Food Products Ltd.
It breeds in broad, dense, young willow and tamarisk stands, forages among marsh plants like cattails, and migrates along the lifelines of desert streams.
Also, the son of Tamarisk shouldn't be inconvenienced by cut in the ground, having won over the course on soft ground last October.
Ullian and his wife Seema live at the Phyllis Siperstein Tamarisk Assisted Living Center in Warwick, R.
In the case of the Grand Canyon tamarisk hunters, however, this is protocol.