tangata whenua


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tangata whenua

(ˈtɑːŋɡɑːtə ˈfɛnʊːə)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) NZ the indigenous Māori people of a particular area of New Zealand or of the country as a whole
[Māori, literally: people of the land]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Our Declaration plan will identify specific actions that can make real progress on the aspirations of Maori as the tangata whenua of Aotearoa - New Zealand .
She said although Maori were only seven per cent of NZNO's membership, as tangata whenua they held 50 per cent of the power under NZNO's bicultural model.
Earlier this year, tangata whenua from Easter Island (Rapanui) accompanied one of their ancestors home from Canterbury Museum, with the support of Te Papa.
Teachers' emphasis on tangata whenua's relationship to the land allows children to view water, mountains and Papatuanuku through bicultural eyes.
There is acknowledgement that the word kawa is of significant importance to the Maori, Tangata whenua of Aotearoa/New Zealand.
She said it is natural that decision-making bodies around Aotearoa should value the unique voice that "tangata whenua" could bring to the table.
There's always a few dark sheep in any whanau--I suppose I should include myself in that category from time to time--but I do think that as multiculturalism in New Zealand, the multi-ethnic composition of our country grows, Maori are going to need to be more and more assertive in keeping their primary identity as tangata whenua to the fore, for fear of being swallowed up.
Using Momaday's poem as an entry point, in the next chapter he stages multiple juxtapositions of diverse Indigenous texts across historical and geographical boundaries and across genres and media--"Sad Joke on a Marae" by Maori poet Apirana Taylor, "Tangata Whenua" by Maori hip-hop group Upper Hutt Posse, "Blood Quantum" by Native Hawaiian poet Naomi Losch, and "When I of Fish Eat" by Maori poet Rowley Habib, with illustrations by Maori artist Ralph Hotere.
To some they were 'iwi', 'Maori', 'tangata whenua', and 'indigenous', while for others they were 'natives', 'cannibals', 'wreckers and haters', 'immigrants' to a nation now called New Zealand.
Maori, as tangata whenua, are the kaitiaki (guardians) of these ecosystems and have a responsibility to protect and enhance them.
university students who identified either as Tangata Whenua (1) Maori or New