tangibility


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tan·gi·ble

 (tăn′jə-bəl)
adj.
1.
a. Discernible by the touch; palpable: a tangible roughness of the skin.
b. Possible to touch.
c. Possible to be treated as fact; real or concrete: tangible evidence.
2. Possible to understand or realize: the tangible benefits of the plan.
3. Law Relating to or being property of a physical nature, such as land, objects, and goods.
n.
1. Something palpable or concrete.
2. tangibles Property having a physical form.

[Late Latin tangibilis, from Latin tangere, to touch; see tag- in Indo-European roots.]

tan′gi·bil′i·ty, tan′gi·ble·ness n.
tan′gi·bly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tangibility - the quality of being perceivable by touch
corporality, corporeality, physicalness, materiality - the quality of being physical; consisting of matter
impalpability, intangibility, intangibleness - the quality of being intangible and not perceptible by touch
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

tangibility

noun
The quality or condition of being discernible by touch:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مَلْموسِيَّه
hmatatelnost
konkrethed
megtapinthatóság
áòreifanleiki
hmatateľnosť
elle tutulabilmesomutluk

tangibility

[ˌtændʒɪˈbɪlɪtɪ] Ntangibilidad f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tangibility

nGreifbarkeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

tangible

(ˈtӕndʒəbl) adjective
real or definite. tangible evidence.
ˈtangibly adverb
ˈtangibility noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
What he saw took on tangibility. His abnormal power of vision made abstractions take on concrete form.
The situation is suggestive of a reality and a tangibility that seem at variance with the vagueness and mystery and ghostliness that one naturally attaches to the character of a god.
She was thrilling with unexpressed love for the mother she had never seen, and this written speech from the grave seemed to give more tangibility to her having ever existed, than did the vision of her.
Near the horizon the sun was smouldering dimly, almost obscured by formless mists and vapors, which gave an impression of mass and density without outline or tangibility. The man pulled out his watch, the while resting his weight on one leg.
Moreover this table includes mean, median, maximum and minimum, standard deviation, sum and observation of control variables such as firm size, tax shield, growth opportunity, firm profitability, asset tangibility, assets maturity and earning volatility.
With regard to the control variables, Table III reveals that the likelihood of a security issuance over an asset sale increases with growth opportunities, firm size, past stock market performance, and financing constraint, and it decreases with leverage, firm age, and asset tangibility. The coefficient of 0.144 on the natural logarithm of firm size indicates that a one percentage point increase in firm size increases the log odds of a security issuance by 0.0014.
Therefore, we investigated the relationships between spa hotel quality (tangibility, assurance, reliability, empathy, and responsiveness), emotion (pleasure and arousal), satisfaction, and desire, and assessed the influence of these relationships on customer behavioral intention in the spa hotel sector.
Tangibility: All the physical items that can be observed by human senses.
Tangibility is a powerful tool to helping people connect with a past that seems very far back until they can touch, see, and explore the places of that time.
They have found that profitability and growth are negatively related, whereas size and tangibility are positively related with dependent variable, leverage.
The general character and modes of creation of TCEs place them atman ambiguous position is-a-vise the IP law, which requires distinct modes of authorship of protected works, tangibility, fixation and duration of rights.