tango

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tan·go

 (tăng′gō)
n. pl. tan·gos
1. A dance of Argentine origin for couples in 2/4 or 4/4 time.
2. The music for this dance.
intr.v. tan·goed, tan·go·ing, tan·gos
To perform this dance.

[American Spanish, possibly of Niger-Congo origin; akin to Ibibio tamgu, to dance.]

tan′go·like′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tango

(ˈtæŋɡəʊ)
n, pl -gos
1. (Dancing) a Latin American dance in duple time, characterized by long gliding steps and sudden pauses
2. (Music, other) a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance
vb, -goes, -going or -goed
(Dancing) (intr) to perform this dance
[C20: from American Spanish, probably of Niger-Congo origin; compare Ibibio tamgu to dance]
ˈtangoist n

Tango

(ˈtæŋɡəʊ)
n
(Telecommunications) communications a code word for the letter t
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tan•go

(ˈtæŋ goʊ)

n., pl. -gos, n.
1. a ballroom dance of Latin-American origin, danced by couples, and having many varied steps and poses.
2. music for this dance.
v.i.
3. to dance the tango.
[1910–15; < American Spanish; Sp: a flamenco dance]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

tango


Past participle: tangoed
Gerund: tangoing

Imperative
tango
tango
Present
I tango
you tango
he/she/it tangoes
we tango
you tango
they tango
Preterite
I tangoed
you tangoed
he/she/it tangoed
we tangoed
you tangoed
they tangoed
Present Continuous
I am tangoing
you are tangoing
he/she/it is tangoing
we are tangoing
you are tangoing
they are tangoing
Present Perfect
I have tangoed
you have tangoed
he/she/it has tangoed
we have tangoed
you have tangoed
they have tangoed
Past Continuous
I was tangoing
you were tangoing
he/she/it was tangoing
we were tangoing
you were tangoing
they were tangoing
Past Perfect
I had tangoed
you had tangoed
he/she/it had tangoed
we had tangoed
you had tangoed
they had tangoed
Future
I will tango
you will tango
he/she/it will tango
we will tango
you will tango
they will tango
Future Perfect
I will have tangoed
you will have tangoed
he/she/it will have tangoed
we will have tangoed
you will have tangoed
they will have tangoed
Future Continuous
I will be tangoing
you will be tangoing
he/she/it will be tangoing
we will be tangoing
you will be tangoing
they will be tangoing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tangoing
you have been tangoing
he/she/it has been tangoing
we have been tangoing
you have been tangoing
they have been tangoing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tangoing
you will have been tangoing
he/she/it will have been tangoing
we will have been tangoing
you will have been tangoing
they will have been tangoing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tangoing
you had been tangoing
he/she/it had been tangoing
we had been tangoing
you had been tangoing
they had been tangoing
Conditional
I would tango
you would tango
he/she/it would tango
we would tango
you would tango
they would tango
Past Conditional
I would have tangoed
you would have tangoed
he/she/it would have tangoed
we would have tangoed
you would have tangoed
they would have tangoed
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

tango

A slow, graceful ballroom dance, characterized by frequent deep bending of the knees and quick changes of direction. A most complex and subtle dance from nineteenth-century Argentina.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tango - a ballroom dance of Latin-American origintango - a ballroom dance of Latin-American origin
ballroom dance, ballroom dancing - any of a variety of social dances performed by couples in a ballroom
2.tango - music written in duple time for dancing the tango
dance music - music to dance to
Verb1.tango - dance a tango
trip the light fantastic, trip the light fantastic toe, dance - move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; "My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
تانْغو: رَقْصَة التانْغويَرْقُص رَقْصَة التانْغو
tangotančit tango
danse tangotango
Tango
Tauno
tangótangózik
dansa tangótangó
šokti tangotango
dejot tangotango
tancovať tangotango
tangotango yapmak

tango

[ˈtæŋgəʊ]
A. N (tangos (pl)) → tango m
B. VIbailar el tango
it takes two to tangoes cosa de dos
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tango

[ˈtæŋgəʊ]
ntango m
vidanser le tango
it takes two to tango → il faut être deux pour danser le tango
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tango

nTango m
viTango tanzen; they tangoed across the roomsie tanzten im Tangoschritt durch das Zimmer; it takes two to tango (fig inf)es gehören immer zwei dazu
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

tango

[ˈtæŋgəʊ] ntango
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

tango

(ˈtӕŋgou) plural ˈtangos noun
(music for) a type of South American dance.
verb3rd person singular present tense ˈtangos: past tense, past participle ˈtangoed
to perform this dance.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Tangoing the Text: Manuel Puig's Boquitas pintadas." Hispanofila 138 (2003): 95-110.
In the 1980s, even while Argentines were tangoing round the supermarkets trying to keep up with unprecedented daily price hikes caused by an imploding economy, Juan Carlos Copes, himself a milonguero (one who frequents milongas) proved with Tango Argentino that the genre was alive and kicking, flicking and flashing more than ever.
Instead, male authors have reasoned that woman-with-woman tangoing must be either a preparation or a poor substitute for tangoing with men.