taniwha


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taniwha

(ˈtʌniːfɑː; ˈtænəwɑː)
n
(Non-European Myth & Legend) NZ a legendary Māori monster
[Māori]
References in periodicals archive ?
ori technoverse, Digital Native Academys (DNA) Taniwha tech, 48Hr Live Stream Fierce Girls Animation Hack, Rotorua
Indeed, the first two poems in Making a Fist of It reference taniwha and the sand of Karirikura at the southern end of Ninety Mile Beach, which is part of the spirits' pathway to Cape Reinga.
6) [2003] NZCA 117, [2003] 3 NZLR 643 [Ngati Apa], For a more detailed consideration of this case, see Richard Boast, "Maori Proprietary Claims to the Foreshore and Seabed after Ngati Apa" (2004) 21:1 NZULR 1; PG McHugh, "Aboriginal Title in New Zealand: A Retrospect and Prospect" (2004) 2:2 NZJ Public & Intl L 139: Nin Tomas & Karensa Johnston, "Ask That Taniwha Who Owns the Foreshore and Seabed of Aotearoa" (2004) 1 J Maori Leg Writing 10.
Waikato taniwha rau, he piko he taniwha, he piko he taniwha Waikato of a hundred taniwha, at every bend a chief, at every bend a chief
In an interesting cultural connection, cautionary tales of the taniwha are told to Maori children, just as American youngsters hear that the "bogeyman" will get them if they don't behave themselves.
Sure enough, there he was, standing proudly on three legs in the centre of the glass door, not the Maori taniwha but - Y Ddraig Goch (The Red Dragon).
Because of her strong Tainui links, she was able to help Te Runanga welcome back the pounamu taonga - Te Taniwha Tangaroa o Papatuanuku - which was first taken to Tonga for the SPNF in 1998.
See also Ann Hardy, "Return of the Taniwha," 90; 93; 97-100.
Taku ate hoki ra, taku rata tutahi, taku whakamarumaru, taku whare ki tonu, taku tiketike ka riro, unuhia noatia te taniwha i te rua.
It is regarded as a place of beginnings for the Tangata Whenua as it was here that Kupe, the great Polynesian navigator, arrived along with two taniwha, Arai Te Uru and Niniwa, who remain as guardians of the south and north sides of the Hokianga Harbour to this day.
Hone and Temepara's cousins, Rangi and Ngaire, are much happier these days that their firm traditional religious beliefs in taniwha (spiritual guardians or monsters), mauri (life force), kaitiakitanga (spiritual guardianship), tohunga ( faith healers /priests), waahi tapu (sacred sites) and the like, are taken seriously by civil tribunals in environmental, bioethical and other decision-making contexts.
The Dragon and the Taniwha, Auckland University Press, Auckland.