taniwha


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taniwha

(ˈtʌniːfɑː; ˈtænəwɑː)
n
(Non-European Myth & Legend) NZ a legendary Māori monster
[Māori]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
? Main, the Orlando skyline from Lake Eola, while above from left, Cabana Bay Beach Resort, Lucy and Hannah in Volcano Bay, at Universal Studios, and its Taniwha Tubes ride
"We need to make sure we have the korero kanohi ki te kanohi, pakihiwi ki te pakihiwi, look the taniwha in the eye and have the conversation.
Indeed, the first two poems in Making a Fist of It reference taniwha and the sand of Karirikura at the southern end of Ninety Mile Beach, which is part of the spirits' pathway to Cape Reinga.
(6) [2003] NZCA 117, [2003] 3 NZLR 643 [Ngati Apa], For a more detailed consideration of this case, see Richard Boast, "Maori Proprietary Claims to the Foreshore and Seabed after Ngati Apa" (2004) 21:1 NZULR 1; PG McHugh, "Aboriginal Title in New Zealand: A Retrospect and Prospect" (2004) 2:2 NZJ Public & Intl L 139: Nin Tomas & Karensa Johnston, "Ask That Taniwha Who Owns the Foreshore and Seabed of Aotearoa" (2004) 1 J Maori Leg Writing 10.
The sleeping taniwha: Exploring the practical utility of kaupapa Maori in firm performance.
Waikato taniwha rau, he piko he taniwha, he piko he taniwha Waikato of a hundred taniwha, at every bend a chief, at every bend a chief Waikato Maori believed that the bends of their river were populated by taniwha or guardians, who manifest themselves when supernatural interventions are called for.
One such legend, Auwhkehu and the Taniwha (pronounced Tah-nee-fa), fascinated me, and I knew it would fascinate my students back home, too.
"Not a Welsh dragon?" "Yes, look, in the glass." Sure enough, there he was, standing proudly on three legs in the centre of the glass door, not the Maori taniwha but - Y Ddraig Goch (The Red Dragon).
The engineer from Hamilton in New Zealand said the Native Maori would call the mysterious creature "Taniwha" which means troll.
When he finished the chant, he was carried away on a whale or sea-monster (paikea or taniwha) and taken to the east coast of the North Island.
The entire back wall offers two distinctive Maori oral traditions of their coming to the land, the spiritual presence of their ancestors, and the relationships they have with land and animals (two specifically are the Pouakai and Taniwha).