tannic acid


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Related to tannic acid: tannin

tannic acid

n.
1. A hydrolyzable tannin in the form of a lustrous yellowish to light brown amorphous, powdered, flaked, or spongy substance having the approximate composition C76H52O46, derived from certain plants and used in tanning leather, in fixing dyes to materials, and in clarifying wine and beer.
2. See tannin.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tannic acid - any of various complex phenolic substances of plant origin; used in tanning and in medicine
cutch, kutch - tannin extract derived from any of several mangrove barks of Pacific areas
phenol - any of a class of weakly acidic organic compounds; molecule contains one or more hydroxyl groups
catechin - a tannic acid that is extracted from black catechu as a white crystalline substance
Translations

tannic acid

nTannin nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Aqueous solutions of tannic acid were used as standards for plotting working curve [18].
Never allow tea to brew for more than three minutes "or tannic acid is developed, which is injurious.
The effect of various laccase inducers like copper sulphate, tannic acid, catechol, hydroquinone, acetaminophen and pyrogallol on laccase production was carried out by adding 0.
The TP, non-tannin phenols and condensed tannin contents of OCS and TMR were analyzed according the method of Makkar [15], and were expressed as tannic acid equivalent.
John Wilson, by email AWATER or plaster will turn untreated oak black, it's to do with the tannic acid found in the oak.
The densitometric analysis of proteins was performed before and after the interaction of saliva with five standard solutions containing tannic acid (2 to 10 g/L in water).
As previously mentioned, the tannic acid content of acorns is the only thing standing in the way of them being edible.
The laccase producing fungi were preliminarily screened from soil samples; 10 fungal isolates were found to produce brown halos on PDA plates containing tannic acid as a laccase production indicator.
I did ask around for a few original ways to use sweet chestnuts and was surprised to be told by a young, new-era chef, that they are not supposed to be eaten raw owing to their tannic acid content.
Tannic acid with low levels affords protection against polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced foresto-mach and lung [11].
135] demonstrated that tannic acid administration restored antioxidant levels, decreased lipid peroxidation, and improve renal function.