tapestry


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Related to tapestry: Wall Tapestry

tap·es·try

 (tăp′ĭ-strē)
n. pl. tap·es·tries
1.
a. A heavy cloth woven with rich, often varicolored designs or scenes, usually hung on walls for decoration and sometimes used to cover furniture.
b. A cloth embroidered with designs or scenes, especially one made in the Middle Ages.
2. Something felt to resemble a richly and complexly designed cloth: the tapestry of world history.
tr.v. tap·es·tried (-ĭ-strēd), tap·es·try·ing, tap·es·tries (-ĭ-strēz)
1. To hang or decorate with tapestry.
2. To make, weave, or depict in a tapestry.

[Middle English tapiceri, tapstri, from Old French tapisserie, from tapisser, to cover with carpet, from tapis, carpet, from Greek tapētion, diminutive of tapēs, perhaps of Iranian origin.]

tapestry

(ˈtæpɪstrɪ)
n, pl -tries
1. (Art Terms) a heavy ornamental fabric, often in the form of a picture, used for wall hangings, furnishings, etc, and made by weaving coloured threads into a fixed warp
2. (Knitting & Sewing) another word for needlepoint
3. a colourful and complicated situation: the rich tapestry of London life.
[C15: from Old French tapisserie carpeting, from Old French tapiz carpet; see tapis]
ˈtapestried adj
ˈtapestry-ˌlike adj

tap•es•try

(ˈtæp ə stri)

n., pl. -tries, n.
1. a fabric consisting of a warp upon which colored threads are woven by hand to produce a reversible design, often pictorial, used for wall hangings, furniture coverings, etc.
2. a machine-woven, nonreversible reproduction of this.
v.t.
3. to furnish, cover, or adorn with tapestry.
4. to represent or depict in a tapestry.
[1400–50; late Middle English tapst(e)ry, tapistry < Middle French tapisserie carpeting. See tapis]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tapestry - something that resembles a tapestry in its complex pictorial designstapestry - something that resembles a tapestry in its complex pictorial designs; "the tapestry of European history"
complexity, complexness - the quality of being intricate and compounded; "he enjoyed the complexity of modern computers"
2.tapestry - a heavy textile with a woven designtapestry - a heavy textile with a woven design; used for curtains and upholstery
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
3.tapestry - a wall hanging of heavy handwoven fabric with pictorial designstapestry - a wall hanging of heavy handwoven fabric with pictorial designs
edging - border consisting of anything placed on the edge to finish something (such as a fringe on clothing or on a rug)
hanging, wall hanging - decoration that is hung (as a tapestry) on a wall or over a window; "the cold castle walls were covered with hangings"
Translations
نَسيج مُطَرَّز، تَطْريز
tapisérie
gobelinvægtæppe
faliszõnyeg
myndvefnaîur
gobelenas
gobelēns
tapiséria
tapiserija
duvar örtüsügoblen

tapestry

[ˈtæpɪstrɪ] N (= object) → tapiz m; (= art) → tapicería f

tapestry

[ˈtæpɪstri] n
(= needlework) → tapisserie f
(fig)fresque f
The book presents a tapestry of teenage life in the provinces → Le livre est une fresque de la vie adolescente en province.

tapestry

nWand- or Bildteppich m; (= fabric)Gobelin m; tapestry-makingTapisserie f; it’s all part of life’s rich tapestrydas gibt alles dem Leben mehr Würze

tapestry

[ˈtæpɪstrɪ] n (object) → arazzo, tappezzeria; (art) → mezzo punto

tapestry

(ˈtӕpəstri) plural ˈtapestries noun
(a piece of) cloth into which a picture or design has been sewn or woven, hung on a wall for decoration or used to cover eg the seats of chairs. Four large tapestries hung on the walls.
References in classic literature ?
Its light illuminated a strip of thick tapestry, hanging loose from the ceiling to the floor, on the wall opposite to the door by which we had entered.
Scarcely had I gained my post than the tapestry at the opposite end of the chamber separated and four soldiers of The Guard entered, surrounding a female figure.
I believe I have taken a wrong turning again," she said, standing still at what seemed the end of a short passage with tapestry on the wall.
Leaves of the Nenuphars and silken skirts the same pale green, On flower and laughing face alike the same rose-tints are seen; Like some blurred tapestry they blend within the lake displayed: You cannot part the leaves from silk, the lily from the maid.
Will not your mind misgive you when you find yourself in this gloomy chamber -- too lofty and extensive for you, with only the feeble rays of a single lamp to take in its size -- its walls hung with tapestry exhibiting figures as large as life, and the bed, of dark green stuff or purple velvet, presenting even a funereal appearance?
Ten curious heads were glued to the tapestry and became pale with fury; for their ears, closely applied to the door, did not lose a syllable of what he said, while their mouths repeated as he went on, the insulting expressions of the captain to all the people in the antechamber.
The Chancellor Sequier, who twenty years previously had persecuted her so ruthlessly, stood before her, relating how his carriage had been smashed, how he had been pursued and had rushed into the Hotel d'O , that the hotel was immediately invaded, pillaged and devastated; happily he had time to reach a closet hidden behind tapestry, in which he was secreted by an old woman, together with his brother, the Bishop of Meaux.
He received us the first time in a cabin about a musket shot distant from the rest, furnished out with a throne in the middle built of clay and stones, and covered with tapestry and two velvet cushions.
At that moment, the tapestry of the dressing-room, which we have described above, was raised, and afforded passage to a personage, the mere sight of whom suddenly stopped the crowd, and changed its wrath into curiosity as by enchantment.
None could seem more safe and secure and at her ease than this lady, yet here also was a symbol of human life, for in an instant, even as Alleyne reined aside to let the carriage pass, a wheel flew out from among its fellows, and over it all toppled--carving, tapestry and gilt--in one wild heap, with the horses plunging, the postilion shouting, and the lady screaming from within.
Grose watched them with positive placidity; then I caught the suppressed intellectual creak with which she conscientiously turned to take from me a view of the back of the tapestry.
I recognised magnificent rocks, hung with a tapestry of zoophytes of the most beautiful kind, and I was at first struck by the peculiar effect of this medium.