tapster

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tap·ster

 (tăp′stər)
n.
One who draws and serves liquor for customers; a bartender.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tapster

(ˈtæpstə)
n
1. (Commerce) rare a barman
2. (Forestry) (in W Africa) a man who taps palm trees to collect and sell palm wine
[Old English tæppestre, feminine of tæppere, from tappian to tap2]
ˈtapstress fem n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tapster - a tavern keeper who taps kegs or caskstapster - a tavern keeper who taps kegs or casks
publican, tavern keeper - the keeper of a public house
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

tapster

n (old)Schankkellner(in) m(f), → Zapfer(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
With this permission Sancho settled himself as comfortably as he could on his beast, and taking out of the alforjas what he had stowed away in them, he jogged along behind his master munching deliberately, and from time to time taking a pull at the bota with a relish that the thirstiest tapster in Malaga might have envied; and while he went on in this way, gulping down draught after draught, he never gave a thought to any of the promises his master had made him, nor did he rate it as hardship but rather as recreation going in quest of adventures, however dangerous they might be.
"Tapster, ostler, varlet, hark hither, and a wannion on your lazy limbs!
This latter personage took upon himself the office of tapster when the punch was ready, and after dispensing it all round, led the conversation to the antiquities of York, with which both he and the grey-haired gentleman appeared to be well acquainted.
We can also have learning sessions facilitated by our sommeliers, mixologists and tapsters,' Vega says proudly.
Or The scourging of Tiplers, the Ruine of Bacchus, and the Bane of Tapsters Wherein is plainly set forth all the lawes of the kingdome, that be now in force against ale-house keepers, drunkards, and haunters of ale-houses, with all the paines and penalties in the same lawes.
Martin Luther was instrumental in changing the way work was viewed by acknowledging that the role played by "the tailors, cobblers, masons, carpenters, pot-boys, tapsters, farmers, and all the secular tradesmen ...
Now my whole charge consists of ancients, corporals, lieutenants, gentlemen of companies--slaves as ragged as Lazarus in the painted cloth, where the glutton's dog licked his sores, and such as indeed were never soldiers, but discarded unjust servingmen, younger sons to younger brothers, revolted tapsters, and hostlers trade-fallen, the cankers of a calm world and a long peace, ten times more dishonorable-ragged than an old feazed ancient.
(65) In Shakespeare's Love's Labour's Lost, one such good wit is the braggart soldier, Armado, whose disdain for 'reckoning' is shown up by his young page Moth: 'I am ill at reckoning', boasts Armado, 'it fitteth the spirit of tapsters', to which Moth responds 'you are a gentleman and a gamester, sir', insinuating that a gambler should at least know how to reckon.
442), "but of lewd Kittes / As tapsters and other such that hath wyly wittes / To pik mennes purses and eke to bier hir eye" (ll.
The English in our novels must emulate the Queen's or Shakespeare's English, and migrating to live in the heart of English enlightenment helps us to escape the trappings of the 'palm-wine tapsters and drinkards' of the Heart of Darkness.
Their ranks also included proctors, "apparators," tapsters, a toll taker on London Bridge, and "pattentees." (11) Among the most militant were two ships chandlers, one of whom cried out "Give us peace and a pox take truth," while the other shouted "Let's have peace upon any Conditions." There was also Brodnax the brewer, alleged to be a soldier in the king's army; another man was a vintner from Redcrosse Street, another was a cheesemonger in Thames Street, and there was a butcher in the Shambles who said "He would have the delinquents [meaning those who contributed treasure to the parliamentary cause] punished." (12) A strong youth presence was noted by one newswriter, who referred to "shallow-witted persons, yea ...
(17) Then: Now because this world is as I tell you, not our eternall dewellyng but our litell while wandryng / god wold that we shuld in such wise vse it, as folke that were wery of yt / and that we shuld in this vale of labour, toyle / teares, and miserye / not loke for rest and ease / game, pleasure / welth, and felicitie / for they that so do / fare like a fond felow that goyng toward his own house where he shuld be welthye / wold for a tapsters pleasure become an hosteler by the way / and die in a stable and neuer come at home.