tapstry

tapstry

(ˈtæpstrɪ)
n, pl -stries
obsolete a tap-room in a public house
References in periodicals archive ?
Kit the tapster is one such woman, a young, single woman earning her living as a live-in "servant," that is, a woman who works not for herself or her husband but as an employee; she apparently receives a portion of her wages in the form of lodging in the inn where she works (specifically in the taproom), an arrangement that would not have been unusual (Mate 1999, 47; Jewell 1996, 101-04): "She haled hym into the tapstry, there hir bed was maked" (l.
The Tapstry of Popular Songs in 16th- and 17th-Century China: Reading, Imitation, and Desire.