tarantella


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tar·an·tel·la

 (tăr′ən-tĕl′ə)
n.
1. A lively, whirling southern Italian dance in 6/8 time, once thought to be a remedy for tarantism.
2. The music for this dance.

[Italian, after Taranto.]

tarantella

(ˌtærənˈtɛlə)
n
1. (Dancing) a peasant dance from S Italy
2. (Music, other) a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance, in fast six-eight time
[C18: from Italian, from Taranto Taranto; associated with tarantism]

tar•an•tel•la

(ˌtær ənˈtɛl ə)

n., pl. -las.
1. a rapid, whirling dance of S Italy in 6/8 time.
2. music in the rhythm of a tarantella.
[1775–85; < Italian, =Tarant(o) Taranto + -ella -elle]

tarantella

Believed to have originated in the Italian town of Taranto in southern Italy, it is a swift. whirling dance executed by two people to music in 6/8 time.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tarantella - music composed in six-eight time for dancing the tarantellatarantella - music composed in six-eight time for dancing the tarantella
dance music - music to dance to
2.tarantella - a lively whirling Italian dance for two persons
social dancing - dancing as part of a social occasion
Translations

tarantella

[ˌtærənˈtelə] Ntarantela f

tarantella

nTarantella f
References in classic literature ?
The set in which they found themselves was composed of English, and Amy was compelled to walk decorously through a cotillion, feeling all the while as if she could dance the tarantella with relish.
Among the other gala items: Cranko's From Holberg's Times (Jin Kang and Roland Vogel), Dominique Dumais's Tides of Mind (Karen Kain from Toronto with the now Stuttgart-based Robert Conn), Balanchine's Tarantella (Patricia Salgado and Nowogrodzki), the Summer pas de deux from James Kudelka's The Four Seasons (with Canadian guests Greta Hodgkinson and Harrington), and, as the glittering jewel, Illmann and Maximiliano Guerra with the Don Quixote pas de deux.
For instance, for the scene in which Emilia picks up Desdemona's handkerchief, he wrote a tarantella to represent the poisoning of Othello's mind.
Jenna Rae Lavin and Andrew Drost, on loan from Los Angeles Ballet, gave a spirited performance of Balanchine's bravura Tarantella, Drost soaring effortlessly through leaps and spins and Lavin displaying crisp footwork and solid turns: Another pioneer choreographer solidly presented.
These must be perfectly fitted, but allow enough freedom of movement for the dancing children to perform The hornpipe, the tarantella and Highland fling down the catwalk.
The final task sees contestants up against the clock as they make made-tomeasure dance costumes so the dancing kids can perform the Hornpipe, the Tarantella and Highland dancing down the catwalk.
It is in this town, allegedly, that a wild dance called the tarantella originated.
The Eskies are purveyors of music that meanders from sea soaked waltz to Italian tarantella, from Brassy funeral march-esque lament to weep along Klezmar knees up, from chain gang holler to rag time finger snap.
The songs featured on the album are: Overture, March, Grandfather Waltz, Waltz of the Snowflakes, Spanish Dance, Arabian Dance, Chinese Dance, Russian Dance, Dance of the Reed Flutes, Mother Ginger and Her Children, Waltz of the Flowers, Tarantella, Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy, Final Waltz and Apotheosis.
Although not afraid to unleash the organ's sonorous power occasionally it's predominantly a lyrical work with Duncan Honeybourne (playing the Huddlestone Organ in the Chapel of Jesus College, Cambridge ) and Rupert Mar-r shall-Luck relishing the song-like opening movement, central Romanza and the lively final tarantella.
The two following pieces will be Dimitri Shostakovich's Four Waltzes for flute, clarinet and piano and Camille Saint-Saens' Tarantella, op.6 in A minor flute, clarinet and piano.