tardive dyskinesia


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Related to tardive dyskinesia: neuroleptic malignant syndrome, tardive dystonia

tardive dyskinesia

n.
A chronic disorder of the nervous system characterized by involuntary jerky movements of the face, tongue, jaws, trunk, and limbs, usually caused by prolonged treatment with antipsychotic drugs.

tar′dive dyskine′sia


n.
nerve damage resulting in involuntary rolling of the tongue or twitching of facial or other small muscles, usu. associated with long-term use of antipsychotic drugs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tardive dyskinesia - involuntary rolling of the tongue and twitching of the face or trunk or limbs; often occurs in patients with Parkinsonism who are treated with phenothiazine
dyskinesia - abnormality in performing voluntary muscle movements
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References in periodicals archive ?
Modulation of neuronal dopamine levels in diseases such as tardive dyskinesia, Tourette syndrome, Huntington's chorea, schizophrenia, and tardive dystonia, which are characterized, in part, by a hyperdopaminergic state, should provide symptomatic benefits for patients with these diseases.
Motor symptoms of schizophrenia: is tardive dyskinesia a symptom or side effect?
Morningside's investment in Synchroneuron demonstrates our belief in the potential of SNC-102 to safely and effectively treat neuropsychiatric disorders such as tardive dyskinesia as well as its potential in additional indications, said Gerald Chan, Chairman of Morningside Technology Ventures.
Comment: Tardive dyskinesia is characterized by involuntary movements of the tongue, lips, extremities, and other parts of the body.
Despite the many studies showing that Reglan was associated with tardive dyskinesia (http://www.
The tardive dyskinesia risk was not known at that time.
1-3) The pathophysiology of the antidyskinetic properties of atypical antipsychotics, as well as the pathophysiology of tardive dyskinesia itself, remains unclear.
Glazer, MD, associate clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, how to best manage tardive dyskinesia in patients on antipsychotic therapy is explained.
In long-term studies, the prevalence of tardive dyskinesia often exceeds 50% of all treated patients.
Withania somnifera glycowithanolides (WSG) were investigated for their preventive effect on the animal model of tardive dyskinesia (TD), induced by once daily administration of the neuroleptic, haloperidol (1.