tardyon


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tardyon

(ˈtɑːdɪɒn)
n
a particle travelling slower than the speed of light
References in periodicals archive ?
As you'll see in what follows, a sequence of collapse events produced by the interaction of a tachyon and a tardyon by means of a photon (spin-I luxon) appears to follow a peculiar logical order that is similar to the way in which thought forms into a sequence of words.
We have placed an observer in this spacetime graph, and I show only the light the tardyon emits in his direction.
The observer is perfectly able to distinguish between the blue-shifted light emitted from the earlier events o, 1, and 2 and the red-shifted light from the later events 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and g and can then tell how the tardyon is moving.
Whereas for the tardyon shown in Figure 9 (slower than light speed particle), the observer sees light coming from the tardyon well ahead of when they cross paths.
Hence the blue-shifted light appears to the observer, as he moves into the future, as a recording of the past positions of the tachyon (it looks like a tardyon going backward in space) with the red-shifted light appearing to be a record of its future positions (it looks like a tardyon going forward in space).
Such a jolt is the experience of the tachyon-tardyon interaction--the point where the tachyon and tardyon cross paths.
Remember red means coming after the tachyon and tardyon intersect and blue means before.
In this manner these luxons on average appear to move slower than lightspeed as tardyons and can even appear at rest (zig-zagging back and forth at even lightspeed means you go nowhere) and thereby appearing with inertial rest masses.