tarnish


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tar·nish

(tär′nĭsh)
v. tar·nished, tar·nish·ing, tar·nish·es
v. tr.
1. To dull the luster of; discolor, especially by exposure to air or dirt: Being in the ground for so long tarnished the old coins.
2.
a. To detract from or spoil: a tasteless meal that tarnished an otherwise pleasant evening.
b. To bring disgrace to; sully: a scandal that tarnished his reputation.
v. intr.
1. To lose luster; become discolored: a metal that tarnishes quickly.
2. To become less enjoyable or estimable: Her admiration for the movie's producer quickly tarnished.
n.
1. The condition of being tarnished: no sign of tarnish on the frame.
2. A film or layer of discoloration on a metal surface caused by corrosion or oxidation.
3. The condition of being disgraced or made less estimable: the tarnish on his reputation.

[Middle English ternishen, from Old French ternir, terniss-, to darken, tarnish, from Frankish *tarnjan; see dher- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

tar′nish·a·ble adj.

tarnish

(ˈtɑːnɪʃ)
vb
1. to lose or cause to lose the shine, esp by exposure to air or moisture resulting in surface oxidation; discolour: silver tarnishes quickly.
2. to stain or become stained; taint or spoil: a fraud that tarnished his reputation.
n
a tarnished condition, surface, or film
[C16: from Old French ternir to make dull, from terne lustreless, of Germanic origin; related to Old High German tarnen to conceal, Old English dierne hidden]
ˈtarnishable adj
ˈtarnisher n

tar•nish

(ˈtɑr nɪʃ)

v.t.
1. to dull the luster of or discolor (a metallic surface), esp. by oxidation.
2. to diminish or destroy the purity of; sully: to tarnish a reputation.
v.i.
3. to become tarnished.
n.
4. a tarnished coating.
5. tarnished condition.
6. a stain or blemish.
[1590–1600; < Middle French terniss-, long s. of ternir to dull, deaden < Germanic (compare Old High German tarnjan to hide, obscure); see -ish2]
tar′nish•a•ble, adj.

tarnish


Past participle: tarnished
Gerund: tarnishing

Imperative
tarnish
tarnish
Present
I tarnish
you tarnish
he/she/it tarnishes
we tarnish
you tarnish
they tarnish
Preterite
I tarnished
you tarnished
he/she/it tarnished
we tarnished
you tarnished
they tarnished
Present Continuous
I am tarnishing
you are tarnishing
he/she/it is tarnishing
we are tarnishing
you are tarnishing
they are tarnishing
Present Perfect
I have tarnished
you have tarnished
he/she/it has tarnished
we have tarnished
you have tarnished
they have tarnished
Past Continuous
I was tarnishing
you were tarnishing
he/she/it was tarnishing
we were tarnishing
you were tarnishing
they were tarnishing
Past Perfect
I had tarnished
you had tarnished
he/she/it had tarnished
we had tarnished
you had tarnished
they had tarnished
Future
I will tarnish
you will tarnish
he/she/it will tarnish
we will tarnish
you will tarnish
they will tarnish
Future Perfect
I will have tarnished
you will have tarnished
he/she/it will have tarnished
we will have tarnished
you will have tarnished
they will have tarnished
Future Continuous
I will be tarnishing
you will be tarnishing
he/she/it will be tarnishing
we will be tarnishing
you will be tarnishing
they will be tarnishing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been tarnishing
you have been tarnishing
he/she/it has been tarnishing
we have been tarnishing
you have been tarnishing
they have been tarnishing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been tarnishing
you will have been tarnishing
he/she/it will have been tarnishing
we will have been tarnishing
you will have been tarnishing
they will have been tarnishing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been tarnishing
you had been tarnishing
he/she/it had been tarnishing
we had been tarnishing
you had been tarnishing
they had been tarnishing
Conditional
I would tarnish
you would tarnish
he/she/it would tarnish
we would tarnish
you would tarnish
they would tarnish
Past Conditional
I would have tarnished
you would have tarnished
he/she/it would have tarnished
we would have tarnished
you would have tarnished
they would have tarnished
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tarnish - discoloration of metal surface caused by oxidationtarnish - discoloration of metal surface caused by oxidation
discoloration, discolouration, stain - a soiled or discolored appearance; "the wine left a dark stain"
Verb1.tarnish - make dirty or spotty, as by exposure to air; also used metaphorically; "The silver was tarnished by the long exposure to the air"; "Her reputation was sullied after the affair with a married man"
blob, fleck, blot, spot - make a spot or mark onto; "The wine spotted the tablecloth"
darken - tarnish or stain; "a scandal that darkened the family's good name"

tarnish

verb
1. damage, taint, blacken, sully, drag through the mud, smirch His image was tarnished by the savings and loans scandal.
damage enhance
2. stain, dull, discolour, spot, soil, dim, rust, darken, blot, blemish, befoul, lose lustre or shine It never rusts or tarnishes.
stain shine, brighten, polish up
noun
1. stain, taint, discoloration, spot, rust, blot, blemish The tarnish lay thick on the inside of the ring.

tarnish

verb
1. To spoil the soundness or perfection of:
2. To contaminate the reputation of:
Idioms: give a black eye to, sling mud on.
noun
A mark of discredit or disgrace:
Archaic: attaint.
Idiom: a blot on one's escutcheon.
Translations
فُقْدان اللمَعان أو البَريقيَفْقِد البَريق أو اللمْعَه
matnostzašlostzmatnitztratit lesk
anløbethedløbe an
fényét veszti
falla á, verîa matturmálmur sem hefur falliî á
apnašosapneštiapsinešęsapsineštiaptraukti
apsūbējumsapsūbētblāvumszaudēt mirdzumu
matnosťstratiť leskzmatnieť
kararmakararmak

tarnish

[ˈtɑːnɪʃ]
A. VT (lit) → deslustrar, quitar el brillo a (fig) → manchar, empañar
B. VI [metal] → deslustrarse, perder el brillo

tarnish

[ˈtɑːrnɪʃ] vt
[+ metal] → ternir
[+ reputation, image] → ternir

tarnish

vt
metalstumpf werden lassen; the silver was tarnished by exposure to airdas Silber war an der Luft angelaufen
(fig) reputation, glorybeflecken; ideals, imagetrüben, den Glanz nehmen (+dat)
vi (metal)anlaufen
nBeschlag m; to prevent tarnishdas Anlaufen verhindern

tarnish

[ˈtɑːnɪʃ]
1. vtossidare, annerire (fig) (reputation) → infangare, macchiare
2. viossidarsi, annerirsi

tarnish

(ˈtaːniʃ) verb
to (cause a metal to) become dull and stained. Silver tarnishes easily.
noun
a dull, stained appearance on a metal surface.
ˈtarnished adjective
References in classic literature ?
Alan was well enough pleased to see his finery so fully remembered and set down; only when he came to the word tarnish, he looked upon his lace like one a little mortified.
If momentary rays of glory break forth from the gloom, while they dazzle us with a transient and fleeting brilliancy, they at the same time admonish us to lament that the vices of government should pervert the direction and tarnish the lustre of those bright talents and exalted endowments for which the favored soils that produced them have been so justly celebrated.
What money would be drawn out of Tellson's henceforth, and what would lie there, lost and forgotten; what plate and jewels would tarnish in Tellson's hiding-places, while the depositors rusted in prisons, and when they should have violently perished; how many accounts with Tellson's never to be balanced in this world, must be carried over into the next; no man could have said, that night, any more than Mr.
He had about him, he says, a trusty plaid; an old and valued travelling companion and comforter; upon which the rains had descended, and the snows and winds beaten, without further effect than somewhat to tarnish its primitive lustre.
The last rays of the sun Lit but the tops of trees and mountain-peaks With tarnished glory; and the water's sheen, Once blue and bright, grew lustreless, and soon A welter of red clouds alone betrayed The passing of the sun.
There were non there, and she took from her pocket a yellow set of ivory tablets, mounted in tarnished gold, and wrote upon them with a pencil in a case of tarnished gold that hung from her neck.
He looked round the little cabin, at the painted beams, at the tarnished varnish of bulkheads; he looked round as if appealing to all its shabby strangeness, to the disorderly jumble of unfamiliar things that belong to an inconceivable life of stress, of power, of endeavour, of unbelief--to the strong life of white men, which rolls on irresistible and hard on the edge of outer darkness.
The gold of its heavily-wrought frame was tarnished, and its surface so blurred, that the old woman's figure, whenever she paused before it, looked indistinct and ghost-like.
The tapestry hung down from the walls in many places, and in others was tarnished and faded under the effects of the sun, or tattered and decayed by age.
He knew that he had tarnished himself, filled his mind with corruption and given horror to his fancy; that he had been an evil influence to others, and had experienced a terrible joy in being so; and that of the lives that had crossed his own, it had been the fairest and the most full of promise that he had brought to shame.
There were bits of old brocade on the walls, and the piano was covered with a piece of silk, beautiful and tarnished; in one corner was a copy of the Venus of Milo, and in another of the Venus of the Medici.
The peculiarities of lighting, the masses of dingy red and tarnished gold, the heaviness of the shadows and the decorative lines, offered a new theme; and half the studios in the Quarter contained sketches made in one or other of the local theatres.