tarsi


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tar·sus

 (tär′səs)
n. pl. tar·si (-sī, -sē)
1.
a. The section of the vertebrate foot between the leg and the metatarsus.
b. The bones making up this section, especially the seven small bones of the human ankle.
2. A fibrous plate that supports and shapes the edge of the eyelid. Also called tarsal plate.
3. Zoology
a. The tarsometatarsus.
b. The distal part of the leg of an arthropod, usually divided into segments.

[New Latin, from Greek tarsos, ankle; see ters- in Indo-European roots.]

Tar·sus

 (tär′səs)
A city of southern Turkey near the Mediterranean Sea west of Adana. Settled in the Neolithic Period, it was one of the most important cities of Asia Minor under Roman rule (after 67 bc). Saint Paul was born in Tarsus.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Kirby has remarked (and I have observed the same fact) that the anterior tarsi, or feet, of many male dung-feeding beetles are very often broken off; he examined seventeen specimens in his own collection, and not one had even a relic left.
Legs of both sexes with scopulae on tarsi I--II and also on metatarsi I--II of females and some males; male tibia I usually with prolateral clasping spurs.
The most common reason for residual pain after a sprained ankle is sinus tarsi syndrome.
It can be distinguished from Tmesiphantes hypogeus by the position of urticating setal patch in the middle of abdomen (in posterior half in Tmesiphantes hypogeus), the well-developed scopulae on metatarsi I and II covering 80-100% of this leg segment (30% in tarsi I and II in T.
Tarsi of all legs with a fine hispid ornamentation ventrally and laterally.
Coloration similar to that of male, but antennae lack the white rings, and the hind tibiae and tarsi are red, not dark blue.
The object is to allow retailers to fine tune their marketing displays to the changing demographics and ultimately generate more revenue for themselves and the airports," says President and CEO, Intersystems, Yami Tarsi.