tartan


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tar·tan 1

 (tär′tn)
n.
1.
a. Any of numerous textile patterns consisting of stripes of varying widths and colors crossed at right angles against a solid background, each forming a distinctive design worn by the members of a Scottish clan.
b. A twilled wool fabric or garment having such a pattern.
2. A plaid fabric.

[Middle English tartane, possibly from Old French tiretaine, linsey-woolsey, probably from tiret, a kind of cloth, from tire, silk cloth, from Latin Tyrius, Tyrian (cloth), from Tyrus, Tyre.]

tar′tan adj.

tar·tan 2

 (tär′tn, tär-tăn′)
n.
A small, single-masted Mediterranean ship with a large lateen sail.

[French tartane, from Provençal tartano, from Old Provençal tartana, buzzard, of imitative origin.]

tartan

(ˈtɑːtən)
n
1. (Textiles)
a. a design of straight lines, crossing at right angles to give a chequered appearance, esp the distinctive design or designs associated with each Scottish clan: the Buchanan tartan.
b. (as modifier): a tartan kilt.
2. (Textiles) a woollen fabric or garment with this design
3. (Clothing & Fashion) the tartan Highland dress
[C16: perhaps from Old French tertaine linsey-woolsey, from Old Spanish tiritaña a fine silk fabric, from tiritar to rustle]
ˈtartaned adj

tartan

(ˈtɑːtən)
n
(Nautical Terms) a single-masted vessel used in the Mediterranean, usually with a lateen sail
[C17: from French, perhaps from Provençal tartana falcon, buzzard, since a ship was frequently given the name of a bird]

tar•tan

(ˈtɑr tn)

n.
1. a woolen or worsted cloth woven with stripes of different colors and widths crossing at right angles, worn chiefly by the Scottish Highlanders, each clan having its own distinctive pattern.
2. such a pattern known by the name of the clan wearing it; plaid.
3. any plaid or plaid fabric.
adj.
4. of, resembling, or made of tartan.
[1490–1500; variant of tertane < Middle French tertaine linsey-woolsey]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tartan - a cloth having a crisscross designtartan - a cloth having a crisscross design  
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
Translations
kostkovanýtartan
skotskternettartan
ruudullinen
tartan
skótkockás gyapjúszövettartán
tartanefnitartanefni, skotadúkur
タータンの
타탄의
languota škotiška medžiagaškotiškos medžiagos raštas
rūtains vilnas audumsrūtis
tartan
tartan
skotskrutig
ลายสกอต
ekosekareli kumaşözel ekose desen
có kẻ ô vuông

tartan

[ˈtɑːtən] Ntartán m, tela f a cuadros escoceses
a tartan scarfuna bufanda escocesa

tartan

[ˈtɑːrtən]
ntartan m
adjécossais(e)
a tartan scarf → une écharpe écossaiseTartan Army n (in Scotland) surnom des supporters de l'équipe nationale écossaise de football

tartan

n (= pattern)Schottenkaro nt; (= material)Schottenstoff m; what’s your tartan?welches Clanmuster tragen Sie?
adj skirt etcim Schottenkaro or -muster

tartan

[ˈtɑːtən]
1. ntartan m inv, tessuto scozzese
2. adjdi tessuto scozzese

tartan

(ˈtaːtən) noun
1. (woollen or other cloth woven with) a pattern of different coloured lines and broader stripes, crossing each other at right angles, originally used by clans of the Scottish Highlands.
2. any one pattern of this sort, usually associated with a particular clan etc. the Cameron tartan.

tartan

زِيْ الطرطان الاِسْكُتْلَنْدِيّ kostkovaný skotskternet im Schottenmuster ταρτάν tartán ruudullinen écossais tartan tessuto scozzese タータンの 타탄의 Schotse ruit skotskrutet tartan axadrezado из шотландки skotskrutig ลายสกอต ekose có kẻ ô vuông 格子呢的
References in classic literature ?
As Dantes (his eyes turned in the direction of the Chateau d'If) uttered this prayer, he saw off the farther point of the Island of Pomegue a small vessel with lateen sail skimming the sea like a gull in search of prey; and with his sailor's eye he knew it to be a Genoese tartan.
However, the vessel and the swimmer insensibly neared one another, and in one of its tacks the tartan bore down within a quarter of a mile of him.
This time he was both seen and heard, and the tartan instantly steered towards him.
When he opened his eyes Dantes found himself on the deck of the tartan.
This oath was no longer a vain menace; for the fastest sailer in the Mediterranean would have been unable to overtake the little tartan, that with every stitch of canvas set was flying before the wind to Leghorn.
They were forbidden to wear the kilt or the tartan, and everything was done to make them speak English and forget Gaelic.
A second witness testified to having seen him wearing "a blue coat with silver buttons, a red waistcoat, black shag breeches, tartan hose, and a feathered hat, with a big coat, dun coloured," a costume referred to by one of the counsel as "French cloathes which were remarkable.
And he found himself reflecting that the oddity seemed to consist in a particular shape cut out in an incongruous material; as if one saw a top-hat made of tin, or a frock-coat cut out of tartan.
Lady Crawley is made to put on the brightest pea-green in her wardrobe, and my pupils leave off their thick shoes and tight old tartan pelisses, and wear silk stockings and muslin frocks, as fashionable baronets' daughters should.
The monkey, meanwhile, with a thick tail curling out into preposterous prolixity from beneath his tartans, took his station at the Italian's feet.
The Kendal green, though its date is more ancient, ought surely to be as dear to our feelings, as the variegated tartans of the north.
SIERRA LEONE STA TA T RS IN STRIPES Sierra Leone's flagbearer James Fayia leads their athletes HUE'RE THE MAN The colourful Antiguans dance into Celtic Park ANTIGUA ISLE OF MANX A LOT The Isle of Man team doffed their caps to Scotland with tartan hats RETRO COOL The Welsh guys wore Harrington jackets while the girls stood out in vivid red WALES CANADA RESPECT The Canadian team pay tribute to their hosts in tartan trews COME ON Scotland's Kenny Bain, left, roars to the crowd at Celtic Park.