tattered


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

tat·tered

 (tăt′ərd)
adj.
1. Torn into shreds; ragged.
2. Having ragged clothes; dressed in tatters.
3.
a. Shabby or dilapidated.
b. Disordered or disrupted.

tattered

(ˈtætəd)
adj
1. ragged or worn: a tattered old book.
2. wearing ragged or torn clothing: tattered refugees.
3. damaged, defeated, or in disarray: he believes he can bring the tattered party together.

tat•tered

(ˈtæt ərd)

adj.
1. torn to tatters; ragged: a tattered flag.
2. wearing ragged clothing: a tattered old man.
[1300–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tattered - worn to shreds; or wearing torn or ragged clothing; "a man in a tattered shirt"; "the tattered flag"; "tied up in tattered brown paper"; "a tattered barefoot boy"; "a tatterdemalion prince"
worn - affected by wear; damaged by long use; "worn threads on the screw"; "a worn suit"; "the worn pockets on the jacket"
2.tattered - ruined or disrupted; "our shattered dreams of peace and prosperity"; "a tattered remnant of its former strength"; "my torn and tattered past"
destroyed - spoiled or ruined or demolished; "war left many cities destroyed"; "Alzheimer's is responsible for her destroyed mind"

tattered

adjective torn, ripped, ragged, frayed, threadbare He fled wearing a sarong and a tattered shirt.

tattered

adjective
1. Torn into or marked by shreds or tatters:
2. Showing signs of wear and tear or neglect:
Informal: tacky.
Slang: ratty.
Idioms: all the worse for wear, gone to pot, past cure.
Translations
مُمَزَّق
roztrhaný
laset
tættur, rifinn
yırtık pırtık

tattered

[ˈtætəd] ADJ [clothes, flag] → en jirones; [book] → destrozado; [person] → andrajoso, harapiento (fig) [reputation] → hecho trizas

tattered

[ˈtætərd] adj [clothes] → en lambeaux

tattered

adj clothes, personzerlumpt; book, sheetzerfleddert, zerfetzt; (fig) pride, reputationangeschlagen; nerveszerrüttet

tattered

[ˈtætəd] adjsbrindellato/a

tatters

(ˈtӕtəz) noun plural
torn and ragged pieces. tatters of clothing.
ˈtattered adjective
ragged or torn. a tattered cloak/book.
in tatters
in a torn and ragged condition. His clothes were in tatters.
References in classic literature ?
There was a tattered man, fouled with dust, blood and powder stain from hair to shoes, who trudged quietly at the youth's side.
Two others were yeomen of merry Yorkshire, another was a tall stranger in blue, who said he came from London Town, and the last was a tattered stranger in scarlet, who wore a patch over one eye.
Tattered flank and sunken eye, open mouth and red, Locked and lank and lone they lie, the dead upon their dead.
Bananas with their great ragged leaves, like the tattered habiliments of an empress in adversity, grew close up to the house.
The captain threw open the door of the front room on the first floor, and disclosed a female figure, arrayed in a gown of tarnished amber-colored satin, seated solitary on a small chair, with dingy old gloves on its hands, with a tattered old book on its knees, and with one little bedroom candle by its side.
So the good old woman took down from a peg an ancient plum-colored coat of London make, and with relics of embroidery on its seams, cuffs, pocket-flaps, and button-holes, but lamentably worn and faded, patched at the elbows, tattered at the skirts, and threadbare all over.
I have heard that thou art vulgar, but I cannot see how, unless it be that tattered children haunt thy portals, those awful yet smiling entrances to so much joy.
They loved to sit there in the silence, with only each other and the sheeny, prying lizards for company, talking of the old times and planning for the new; while light breezes stirred the tattered vines high up among the columns, where owls nested.
It is not easy to express the benevolence and tenderness with which they embraced us, and the concern they showed at seeing us worn away with hunger, labour, and weariness, our clothes tattered, and our feet bloody.
But mind, don't bring me such tattered and dirty notes as last time, but nice clean ones for the countess.
At last her rags became so tattered and torn that she was ashamed of appearing in the village any longer.
The man flung his tattered rug over the horse, turned full round upon the Governor and said in a voice that sounded almost desperate: