tau

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tau

 (tou, tô)
n.
The 19th letter of the Greek alphabet. See Table at alphabet.

[Greek, of Phoenician origin; see tww in Semitic roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tau

(tɔː; taʊ)
n
(Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) the 19th letter in the Greek alphabet (Τ, τ), a consonant, transliterated as t
[C13: via Latin from Greek, of Semitic origin; see tav]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tau

(taʊ, tɔ)

n., pl. taus.
the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet (T, τ).
[1250–1300; Middle English < Latin < Greek taû < Semitic; compare tav]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tau - the 19th letter of the Greek alphabettau - the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet
Greek alphabet - the alphabet used by ancient Greeks
alphabetic character, letter of the alphabet, letter - the conventional characters of the alphabet used to represent speech; "his grandmother taught him his letters"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
If the muon and tau leptons are excited states of the electron derivable from (25), this would imply that the neutrino portion would also be specific to the muon and tau lepton excited states, thus leading to muon and tau neutrinos.
[14] CMS Collaboration, "Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions," Journal of High Energy Physics, vol.
The researchers analyzed the data gathered at the LHC between 2011 and 2012, combining the Higgs decays into bottom quarks and tau leptons, both of which belong to the fermion particle group and the results revealed that an accumulation of these decays comes about at a Higgs particle mass near 125 gigaelectron volts (GeV) and with a significance of 3.8 sigma.