tau protein


Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to tau protein: Alzheimer disease

tau protein

n.
Any of several proteins that act to stabilize neuronal microtubules in the axons of brain neurons and that form abnormal tangles in the brains of people with certain neurodegenerative disorders.

[From the use of the Greek letter tau to represent the initial t- of tubulin, which it induces to form microtubules.]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
NFTs made up of aggregated tau protein are a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease.
Study Selection: Literature search was based on the following keywords: Alzheimer's disease, tau protein, biomarker, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), therapeutics, plasma, imaging, propagation, spreading, seeding, prion, conformational templating, and posttranslational modification.
NFTs, which are made up of aggregated tau protein, are a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease.
Further, scientists are developing drugs to target tau protein, which is the chief component of tangled bundles of fibers within the Alzheimer's brain, called tau tangles.
The scientists investigated the role of ApoE in mice whose brains contained potentially toxic human tau protein.
Since that time, almost all of the disease-modifying new drugs under development are targeting A[beta] or Tau protein.
Abnormal accumulation of altered tau protein is a hallmark in a variety of neurodegenerative conditions, where the development of tau pathology strongly correlates with clinical disease progression.
Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) is a rare geriatric pathology, from the abnormal deposition of the tau protein, combining the motor tremor and bradykinesia of Parkinson's disease with the cognitive defects of Alzheimer's disease.
Tauopathies are a group of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimers disease that are characterized by the deposition of aggregates of the tau protein inside brain cells.
Amyloid deposition was assessed by positron emission tomography, and ND was assessed by both hippocampal volume loss on MRI and cerebrospinal fluid levels of the AD-linked tau protein.
Like Alzheimer's disease, PSP belongs to the family of neurodegenerative disorders known as tauopathies; these diseases are associated with the formation and progressive spread of toxic oligomers of tau protein in the brain.