taunt

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taunt 1

 (tônt)
tr.v. taunt·ed, taunt·ing, taunts
1. To reproach in a mocking, insulting, or contemptuous manner: taunted her for wearing hand-me-down clothes. See Synonyms at ridicule.
2.
a. To drive or incite (a person) by taunting: His friends taunted him into asking for a raise.
b. To tease and excite sexually: taunted him with glimpses of skin.
n.
A scornful remark; a jeer.

[Origin unknown.]

taunt′er n.
taunt′ing·ly adv.

taunt 2

 (tônt)
adj. Nautical
Unusually tall. Used of masts.

[Origin unknown.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

taunt

(tɔːnt)
vb (tr)
1. to provoke or deride with mockery, contempt, or criticism
2. to tease; tantalize
n
3. a jeering remark
4. archaic the object of mockery
[C16: from French phrase tant pour tant like for like, rejoinder]
ˈtaunter n
ˈtaunting adj
ˈtauntingly adv

taunt

(tɔːnt)
adj
(Nautical Terms) nautical (of the mast or masts of a sailing vessel) unusually tall
[C15: of uncertain origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

taunt1

(tɔnt, tɑnt)

v.t.
1. to reproach in a sarcastic or insulting manner; mock.
2. to provoke by taunts; twit.
n.
3. a scornful or sarcastic reproach or challenge; gibe; insult.
[1505–15; orig. uncertain]
taunt′er, n.
taunt′ing•ly, adv.
syn: See ridicule.

taunt2

(tɔnt, tɑnt)

adj. Naut.
tall, as a mast.
[1490–1500]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

taunt


Past participle: taunted
Gerund: taunting

Imperative
taunt
taunt
Present
I taunt
you taunt
he/she/it taunts
we taunt
you taunt
they taunt
Preterite
I taunted
you taunted
he/she/it taunted
we taunted
you taunted
they taunted
Present Continuous
I am taunting
you are taunting
he/she/it is taunting
we are taunting
you are taunting
they are taunting
Present Perfect
I have taunted
you have taunted
he/she/it has taunted
we have taunted
you have taunted
they have taunted
Past Continuous
I was taunting
you were taunting
he/she/it was taunting
we were taunting
you were taunting
they were taunting
Past Perfect
I had taunted
you had taunted
he/she/it had taunted
we had taunted
you had taunted
they had taunted
Future
I will taunt
you will taunt
he/she/it will taunt
we will taunt
you will taunt
they will taunt
Future Perfect
I will have taunted
you will have taunted
he/she/it will have taunted
we will have taunted
you will have taunted
they will have taunted
Future Continuous
I will be taunting
you will be taunting
he/she/it will be taunting
we will be taunting
you will be taunting
they will be taunting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been taunting
you have been taunting
he/she/it has been taunting
we have been taunting
you have been taunting
they have been taunting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been taunting
you will have been taunting
he/she/it will have been taunting
we will have been taunting
you will have been taunting
they will have been taunting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been taunting
you had been taunting
he/she/it had been taunting
we had been taunting
you had been taunting
they had been taunting
Conditional
I would taunt
you would taunt
he/she/it would taunt
we would taunt
you would taunt
they would taunt
Past Conditional
I would have taunted
you would have taunted
he/she/it would have taunted
we would have taunted
you would have taunted
they would have taunted
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.taunt - aggravation by deriding or mocking or criticizingtaunt - aggravation by deriding or mocking or criticizing
provocation, aggravation, irritation - unfriendly behavior that causes anger or resentment
Verb1.taunt - harass with persistent criticism or carpingtaunt - harass with persistent criticism or carping; "The children teased the new teacher"; "Don't ride me so hard over my failure"; "His fellow workers razzed him when he wore a jacket and tie"
bemock, mock - treat with contempt; "The new constitution mocks all democratic principles"
jeer, scoff, flout, gibe, barrack - laugh at with contempt and derision; "The crowd jeered at the speaker"
banter, chaff, jolly, josh, kid - be silly or tease one another; "After we relaxed, we just kidded around"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

taunt

verb
1. jeer, mock, tease, ridicule, provoke, insult, torment, sneer, deride, revile, twit, take the piss (out of) (taboo slang), guy (informal), gibe Other youths taunted him about his clothes.
noun
1. jeer, dig, insult, ridicule, cut, teasing, provocation, barb, derision, sarcasm, gibe For years they suffered racist taunts.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

taunt

verb
To torment with persistent insult or ridicule:
Informal: needle, ride.
Idiom: wave the red flag in front of the bull.
noun
1. An instance of mockery or derision:
2. Good-natured teasing:
Informal: ribbing.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُلاحَظات ساخِرَهيَسْخَر من، يَنْتَقِد بطَريقَةٍ ساخِرَه
posmívat sevýsměch
hånhånemobbemobning
pilkatapilkka
gúnyos megjegyzés
spott, háîsglósurspotta, stríîa
patyčiatyčiotis iš
aizskaroša piezīmeizsmieklsizsmiet
alayalay etmekiğnelemeksataşmak

taunt

[tɔːnt]
A. N (= jeer) → pulla f, mofa f; (= insult) → insulto m
B. VT (= jeer at) → mofarse de; (= insult) → insultar
to taunt sb (with sth)mofarse de algn (por algo)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

taunt

[ˈtɔːnt]
nmoquerie f
vtnarguer
to taunt sb with sth → narguer qn avec qch
He taunted her with details of her personal life → Il la narguait avec des détails de sa vie personnelle.
to taunt sb about sth → narguer qn à propos de qch
They were taunting me about my weight → Ils me narguaient à propos de ma taille.
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

taunt

nSpöttelei f, → höhnische Bemerkung; he paid no attention to their taunts of “traitor”er kümmerte sich nicht darum, dass sie ihn als Verräter verhöhnten
vt personverspotten, aufziehen (inf)(about wegen); to taunt somebody with racial abusejdn mit rassistischen Beschimpfungen verhöhnen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

taunt

[tɔːnt]
1. nscherno
2. vt to taunt sb (with)schernire qn (per)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

taunt

(toːnt) verb
to tease, or say unpleasant things to (a person) in a cruel way. The children at school taunted him for being dirty.
noun
cruel, unpleasant remarks. He did not seem to notice their taunts.
ˈtaunting adjective
ˈtauntingly adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The atheistic taunts of his cruel master sunk his before dejected soul to the lowest ebb; and, though the hand of faith still held to the eternal rock, it was a numb, despairing grasp.
He shrieked taunts and insults at Numa, and tearing dead branches from the tree in which he danced, hurled them at the lion.
Twenty paces behind the lioness stood the great ape, bellowing instructions to the boy and hurling taunts at the lioness in an evident effort to attract her attention from the lad while he gained the shelter of a near-by tree.
The suggestion seemed to hearten the Lotharian, and in another moment the three stood behind solid ranks of huge bowmen who hurled taunts and menaces at the advancing company emerging from the walled city.
During the entire battle both sides hurled taunts and insults at one another--the human beings naturally excelling the brutes in the coarseness and vileness of their vilification and invective.
A KID standing on the roof of a house, out of harm's way, saw a Wolf passing by and immediately began to taunt and revile him.
A BOSS who had gone to Canada was taunted by a Citizen of Montreal with having fled to avoid prosecution.
He has been taunted more than once about the Diamond, by those who recollect his angry outbreak before the assault; but, as may easily be imagined, his own remembrance of the circumstances under which I surprised him in the armoury has been enough to keep him silent.
He spoke a good deal, and never without a taunt. "Whig" was the best name he had to give me.
Great apes jabbered at them and menaced them; but Tarzan answered them after their own kind, giving back taunt for taunt, insult for insult, challenge for challenge.
Defoe never went to college, and because of this many a time in later days his enemies taunted him with being ignorant and unlearned.
He drew the listening savages round him by his nervous eloquence; taunted them with recitals of past wrongs and insults; drew glowing pictures of triumphs and trophies within their reach; recounted tales of daring and romantic enterprise, of secret marchings, covert lurkings, midnight surprisals, sackings, burnings, plunderings, scalpings; together with the triumphant return, and the feasting and rejoicing of the victors.