taxidermic


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Related to taxidermic: Taxidermied

tax·i·der·my

 (tăk′sĭ-dûr′mē)
n.
The art or operation of preparing, stuffing, and mounting the skins of dead animals for exhibition in a lifelike state.

tax′i·der′mal, tax′i·der′mic adj.
tax′i·der′mist n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
And in another space, they placed a Mario Merz sculpture of a taxidermic reindeer head on top of a window overlooking the garden.
She cited a passage from Pauline Wakeham's book Taxidermic Signs, a quote from Susan Willis, which she says resonates deeply with her: "Zoo animals are body doubles, stand-ins for the real animals existing (or becoming extinct) elsewhere.
Few of the other artists recognized included their bands; she asks hers to add their initials, then, grabbing the taxidermic armadillo that's become something of a tour mascot, pushes in its paw prints too.
In my favorite photo, a taxidermic fox seems to nibble at the slack toe of a model's pantyhose.
Different chapters deal with the earliest reports and descriptions of the apes by travelers and scholars; the introduction of specimens to Europe as exhibits in menageries, taxidermic displays, and graphic art; representations of orangutans in Western fiction, theatre, cinema, and television; the treatment of apes in modern zoos; twentieth century conservation efforts; and the place of the apes (and especially debates concerning their intelligence) in evolutionary theory and movements promoting animal rights.
Racks of camouflage clothing are in place near a department full of treats for hunting dogs, fishing rods are being stocked and taxidermic game animals are perched on a faux mountain display.
The role of these displays can be glossed by reference to Donna Haraway's commentary on the great dioramas filled with taxidermic trophies at New York's Natural History Museum.
His taxidermic inventory, which the persona of the prince required for his prestige, was fine; but his living objects, mainly zoological rarities which he kept in a kind of a zoo, had only brought him frustration and disappointment.
In less than a year, Elizabeth had graduated from illustrating taxidermic curiosities for the records of private clients, to working as a professional lithographer and watercolour painter whose finished designs were purchased by 298 subscribers (Lambourne Bird 36).
I have related doubts about the eagle's palsied left wing in Airborne (1944), about the taxidermic central bird of Two Eagles (1939), and about the shoulder-less, neck-less feline of Tiger and Rabbit (1935).
11) Wakeham, in Taxidermic Signs, discusses the colonized framing that was implemented in dioramas in which typically a wolf, hawk, or such (that had been stuffed/taxidermic) was located and posed in a scene with an "Indian" mannequin.
Johnson was observed as something of a taxidermic vampire; hunting at night, and then skinning by day to reanimate the dead.