te reo


Also found in: Wikipedia.

te reo

(teɪ ˈreɪəʊ)
n
(Languages) NZ the Māori language
[Māori, literally: the language]
References in periodicals archive ?
Activities focus on Te Reo immersion and performing arts.
Every month, with the help of experts from NZNO's Te Runanga, we'll help you learn a few phrases in te reo that you could add to your practice.
For instance, Kura kaupapa Mori or Mori medium schools teach students in te reo Mori or the Mori language, producing students who are proficient in both Maori and English.
Stakeholders (clients/ whanau, Maori health workers, learners and clinicians) have reported high levels of satisfaction with clinical engagement opportunities, due to students appropriately; demonstrating their ability to use the process of whakawhanaungatanga in a clinical interview, confidently using te reo Maori as led by the client/whanau, exploration of all relevant elements of the Meihana Model (including experiences of racism and the impact of colonisation) alongside client/whanau, influencing senior colleagues behaviour and advocating for client/whanau needs within a clinical setting (Pitama, 2012).
She is particularly concerned about the capacity to teach Te Reo Maori when the authorial voice is at work and establishes what may and may not be said through Te Reo Maori (even when it is apparently given full voice).
Timoti Karetu, of the Te Panekiretanga o te Reo school, said: "The reason for our being here is to observe other people who, like us, are committed to the survival of their indigenous languages.
He also looks at the many examples of colonists learning te reo; translating English publications in the Maori language; and taking steps to ensure that te reo had a presence in places such as the church, native schools, and even branches of government.
Te reo Maori (Maori language) is central to the governance, provision and development of health care and health research from a Maori worldview.
Te reo Maori is an official language of New Zealand, and acknowledgement of the founding document, Te Tiriti o Waitangi, the Treaty of Waitangi, is a requirement in the school curriculum.
Te Reo Maori was the predominant language of New Zealand at the beginning of the 19th century but as more English speakers arrived, the language became increasingly con-fined to Maori communities.
However, the dedication then becomes more curious: first we find a mixed line of Latin ('D[ei] G[ratia]') and Te Reo Maori ('Takuta o nga tangata Maori)--to my knowledge the only example of the Maori language inscribed in any medieval manuscript--before a line in Greek, then Latin again ('d[edit] vel), more Te Reo Maori ('homai nomai), and ending with a dash of French ('cette livre), and the date of the gift.