tea tree

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tea tree

n.
1. A melaleuca tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) of Australia whose leaves yield an oil used in cosmetics and for medicinal purposes.
2. Any of various evergreen shrubs or small trees of the genus Leptospermum, native to Southeast Asia and Australasia, having showy flowers and small needlelike leaves formerly used to make a tealike beverage.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tea tree

n
(Plants) any of various myrtaceous trees of the genus Leptospermum, of Australia and New Zealand, that yield an oil used as an antiseptic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tea′ tree`


n.
a tall shrub or small tree, Leptospermum scoparium, of the myrtle family, native to New Zealand and Australia.
[1750–60; so called from the use of its leaves as an infusion]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
Teebaum
References in periodicals archive ?
Commercial tea plantations have row after row of small tea trees grown to the exact same height.
Wild tea trees are found high up in the mountains, growing in biodiverse forests.
Pumpkin seed works as a natural form of salicylic acid, and melaleuca, the sap of tea trees, works as an anti-bacterial.
Health food stores claim the answer is an all-natural extract, like clove oil or tea tree oil.
Captain Cook called these tea trees or tea plants because their leaves produced a pleasant, spicy and refreshing tea.
TEA tree oil was used as a medicinal remedy by Aborigines in Australia thousands of years ago.
The shrubs grown today on modern tea plantations are known simply as "tea bushes." Tea plants more than 100 years old are called "tea trees." Tea plants older than 300 years are "old tea trees," while plants dating back 500 years or more are designated "ancient tea trees."
Furthermore, new legislation was introduced by the end of 2008 bestowing a PGI-Protected Geographical Indication--on Pu'er teas together with the requirement that these teas are exclusively produced from the "big leaf tea tree" variety and includes sun drying as one of the processing steps.