teabowl

teabowl

(ˈtiːˌbəʊl)
n
a small bowl used for serving tea
References in periodicals archive ?
Photo: Private collection Top: The Bartlam teapot showing the underglaze printed design of cranes, palm trees and sampan Bottom: Clare Durham of auctioneers Woolley & Wallis with the Bartlam teapot Three views of the Bartlam teabowl sold at Christie's New York for PS76,000 (Photo Christie's Images) The key to the discovery: shards from a Bartlam teabowl found by archaeologists at Cain Hoy and tested as soft porcelain Photo courtesy of The Charleston Museum, Charleston, South Carolina Teapot-3 The Bartlam teapot showing the underglaze printed
Photo: Private collection Three views of the Bartlam teabowl sold at Christie's New York for PS76,000 (Photo Christie's Images) The key to the discovery: shards from a Bartlam teabowl found by archaeologists at Cain Hoy and tested as soft porcelain Photo courtesy of The Charleston Museum, Charleston, South Carolina
Barbara's pretty little jug will not be among them, but the second piece Barry purchased will: a New Hall teabowl and saucer.
For Hein Janssen we feel the same thing, between great simplicity of a teabowl and the large lidded boxes with retractive glaze, the same mastery, same consideration, modernity and tradition made with the same actions.
BODUM'S new Naoko Teabowl combines design and function.
Since there are repeated listings of cups, the size of the smallest of these may well have been consistent with the teabowl of common usage in Vietnam.
A small bowl in that exhibit was bought by a customer who declared to it be just right for use as a teabowl in the summer.
Either way, the teabowl and its contents will be sure to warm a wintry day.
The chawan, or Japanese teabowl, is a widely venerated ceramic form, an object with huge appeal among Western artists, collectors and audiences more generally.
Produced for export, the Chinese cup is quite different from the sort of handleless teabowl the Chinese themselves used.
The Chinese only started using the pink and white enamels seen on this teabowl in about 1720, the pink colour being derived from gold.
The final stage may involve adding black enamel or gilding, as on the lip of the small teabowl.