technicist


Also found in: Medical.

technicist

(ˈtɛknɪsɪst)
n
1. a technician
2. (Philosophy) a person who believes in the utility of technology for improving human societies
References in periodicals archive ?
Dinnen's focus on the banal notably departs from technicist discourses on ubiquitous computation and speculative philosophy often invoked to analyze it (Graham Harman, Alfred North Whitehead).
Finding that practitioner voices to be missing from most histories of education, he writes them back in to offer a counter-narrative to the divisive and elitist ways recent government interventions have framed the school subject English, which has coerced practitioners into technicist and functionalist practices.
These courses promote critical thinking in relation to technicist and reductionist views still prevalent in the area.
The influence of this positivistic model on the modus operandi of science and the fact that it is continuously fed by education reaffirm the myth of objectivity, which was established as a key element in the constitution of contemporary professional activities, especially by means of bureaucratic systems and the technicist tendency of education.
Dietitian training has been shaped by the country's social-political context; initially, within the framework of assistentialist policies, it presented a strong technicist nature and a biology-oriented approach.
It is usually shown that teachers have vague references and are contaminated by the still present behaviorism in education, as well as by the famous and limited technicist pedagogy which stemmed from it.
TQM's reliance on a more technicist centered vocabulary with process equations may have helped it gain adherents in an era where some scholars were trying to legitimate public administration as a scientific enterprise.
In addition, Wood (2014) suggests that the play/ pedagogy interface has become more technicist, emanating from national early childhood frameworks driven by policies.