technocracy


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tech·noc·ra·cy

 (tĕk-nŏk′rə-sē)
n. pl. tech·noc·ra·cies
A government or social system controlled by technicians, especially scientists and technical experts.

[Greek tekhnē, skill; see technical + -cracy.]

technocracy

(tɛkˈnɒkrəsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a theory or system of society according to which government is controlled by scientists, engineers, and other experts
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a body of such experts
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a state considered to be governed or organized according to these principles
technocrat n
ˌtechnoˈcratic adj

tech•noc•ra•cy

(tɛkˈnɒk rə si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. a theory or movement advocating management and control of the economy, government, and social system by technological experts.
2. a system of government in which this theory is applied.
[1919]

technocracy

1. a theory and movement of the 1930s advocating the control of production and distribution by technicians and engineers.
2. a system of government based on this theory. — technocrat, n.technocratic, adj.
See also: Government

technocracy

A form of government in which power is in the hands of scientists and other technicians.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.technocracy - a form of government in which scientists and technical experts are in control; "technocracy was described as that society in which those who govern justify themselves by appeal to technical experts who justify themselves by appeal to scientific forms of knowledge"
form of government, political system - the members of a social organization who are in power
Translations

technocracy

[tekˈnɒkrəsɪ] Ntecnocracia f

technocracy

[tɛkˈnɒkrəsi] n
(= elite) → technocratie f
(= country) → technocratie f

technocracy

nTechnokratie f
References in periodicals archive ?
balance of technocracy and democratic accountability, as well as a
Politicians fear the rise of an all-powerful virtual technocracy that threatens their governing interests.
Notwithstanding the progressive Constitution, which was the product of many years of ideological struggles, we seem to have resigned ourselves to the notion that mere technocracy can drive change.
Drawing on ideas from sociology, philosophy, politics, and ecology, he considers design as a force to counter technocracy and alienation.
'What they are doing is replacing elected members with bureaucracy and technocracy: all powers would go to the chief operating officer.
Technocracy differs from a traditional democracy in that individuals elected to a leadership role are chosen through a process that emphasizes their relevant skills and proven performance, as opposed to whether or not they fit the majority interests of a population.
The technocracy remains in charge of daily management.
He actually takes a much more upbeat view of this trend towards Asian technocracy than many Western commentators would; inspired by the Singapore example, he argues that these countries are rejecting the 'failed' obsession with popular democracy as practised by the US et al in favour of national stability, no matter the cost.
law--fairness, laissez faire, and technocracy. (1) I examine the
But he cautioned against their corrupting influence and warned that "The prospect of domination of the nation's scholars by Federal employment, project allocations, and the power of money is ever present--and is gravely to be regarded...in holding scientific discovery in respect, as we should, we must also be alert to the equal and opposite danger that public policy could itselfbecome the captive of a scientific-technological elite." Already in 1961, Eisenhower saw democracy losing ground to technocracy. What he did not know was that in the decades following the end of the Cold War, technocracy would become progressively more ideological and detached from strategic realities.
People will probably dismiss him as a marionette mouthing the stuff the technocracy produces.