tedious


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te·di·ous

 (tē′dē-əs)
adj.
1. Tiresome by reason of length, slowness, or dullness; boring. See Synonyms at boring.
2. Obsolete Moving or progressing very slowly.

[Middle English, from Late Latin taediōsus, from Latin taedium, tedium.]

te′di·ous·ly adv.
te′di·ous·ness n.

tedious

(ˈtiːdɪəs)
adj
1. causing fatigue or tedium; monotonous
2. obsolete progressing very slowly
ˈtediously adv
ˈtediousness n

te•di•ous

(ˈti di əs, ˈti dʒəs)

adj.
1. marked by tedium; long and tiresome.
2. tiresomely wordy, as a speaker or writer.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin taediōsus]
te′di•ous•ly, adv.
te′di•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tedious - so lacking in interest as to cause mental wearinesstedious - so lacking in interest as to cause mental weariness; "a boring evening with uninteresting people"; "the deadening effect of some routine tasks"; "a dull play"; "his competent but dull performance"; "a ho-hum speaker who couldn't capture their attention"; "what an irksome task the writing of long letters is"- Edmund Burke; "tedious days on the train"; "the tiresome chirping of a cricket"- Mark Twain; "other people's dreams are dreadfully wearisome"
uninteresting - arousing no interest or attention or curiosity or excitement; "a very uninteresting account of her trip"
2.tedious - using or containing too many wordstedious - using or containing too many words; "long-winded (or windy) speakers"; "verbose and ineffective instructional methods"; "newspapers of the day printed long wordy editorials"; "proceedings were delayed by wordy disputes"
prolix - tediously prolonged or tending to speak or write at great length; "editing a prolix manuscript"; "a prolix lecturer telling you more than you want to know"

tedious

tedious

adjective
Translations
مُمِل، مُضْجِر
suchopárný
enerverende
hengetönikäväpitkäveteinentylsä
fárasztóunalmas
leiîinlegur
nuobodulys
apnicīgsgarlaicīgs
dolgočasen
enformiglångtråkigtjatig

tedious

[ˈtiːdɪəs] ADJpesado, aburrido

tedious

[ˈtiːdiəs] adj [task, job] → fastidieux/euse; [details, person] → fastidieux/euse; [conversation] → insipide

tedious

adjlangweilig, öde; behaviourermüdend; such lists are tedious to readsolche Listen lesen sich langweilig

tedious

[ˈtiːdɪəs] adjnoioso/a, tedioso/a

tedious

(ˈtiːdiəs) adjective
boring and continuing for a long time. a tedious speech/speaker.
ˈtediously adverb
ˈtediousness noun
ˈtedium noun
boredom; tediousness. the tedium of a long journey.

tedious

a. tedioso-a, aburrido-a, engorroso-a.
References in classic literature ?
Let not my Reader however suppose that "feeling" is with us the tedious process that it would be with you, or that we find it necessary to feel right round all the sides of every individual before we determine the class to which he belongs.
She had proved an excellent wife to one of our most tedious ambassadors, and having buried her husband properly in a marble mausoleum, which she had herself designed, and married off her daughters to some rich, rather elderly men, she devoted herself now to the pleasures of French fiction, French cookery, and French esprit when she could get it.
The cities of Germany are absolutely free, they own but little country around them, and they yield obedience to the emperor when it suits them, nor do they fear this or any other power they may have near them, because they are fortified in such a way that every one thinks the taking of them by assault would be tedious and difficult, seeing they have proper ditches and walls, they have sufficient artillery, and they always keep in public depots enough for one year's eating, drinking, and firing.
In vain did we count the tedious moments of his absence--in vain did we weep--in vain even did we sigh--no Edward returned--.
Give good hearing to those, that give the first information in business; and rather direct them in the beginning, than interrupt them in the continuance of their speeches; for he that is put out of his own order, will go forward and backward, and be more tedious, while he waits upon his memory, than he could have been, if he had gone on in his own course.
I meant in the beginning to say that railway journeying is tedious and tiresome, and so it is--though at the time I was thinking particularly of a dismal fifty-hour pilgrimage between New York and St.
My friends pursued their course with uneventfulness; they had no longer any surprises for me, and when I met them I knew pretty well what they would say; even their love-affairs had a tedious banality.
Firmin Richard, whom they hardly knew; nevertheless, they were lavish in protestations of friendship and received a thousand flattering compliments in reply, so that those of the guests who had feared that they had a rather tedious evening in store for them at once put on brighter faces.
In the account of Abyssinia, and the continuation, the authors have been followed with more exactness, and as few passages appeared either insignificant or tedious, few have been either shortened or omitted.
The trouble of rummaging among business papers, and of collecting and collating facts from amidst tedious and commonplace details, was spared me by my nephew, Pierre M.
But without this occupation, the life of Vronsky and of Anna, who wondered at his loss of interest in it, struck them as intolerably tedious in an Italian town.
From the chocks it hangs in a slight festoon over the bows, and is then passed inside the boat again; and some ten or twenty fathoms (called box-line) being coiled upon the box in the bows, it continues its way to the gunwale still a little further aft, and is then attached to the short-warp --the rope which is immediately connected with the harpoon; but previous to that connexion, the short-warp goes through sundry mystifications too tedious to detail.