tedium


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te·di·um

 (tē′dē-əm)
n.
The quality or condition of being tedious; tediousness or boredom.

[Latin taedium, from taedēre, to weary.]

tedium

(ˈtiːdɪəm)
n
the state of being bored or the quality of being boring; monotony
[C17: from Latin taedium, from taedēre to weary]

te•di•um

(ˈti di əm)

n.
the quality or state of being wearisome; tediousness.
[1655–65; < Latin taedium]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tedium - the feeling of being bored by something tedioustedium - the feeling of being bored by something tedious
dissatisfaction - the feeling of being displeased and discontent; "he was never slow to express his dissatisfaction with the service he received"
blahs - a general feeling of boredom and dissatisfaction
fatigue - (always used with a modifier) boredom resulting from overexposure to something; "he was suffering from museum fatigue"; "after watching TV with her husband she had a bad case of football fatigue"; "the American public is experiencing scandal fatigue"; "political fatigue"
2.tedium - dullness owing to length or slowness
dullness - the quality of lacking interestingness; "the stories were of a dullness to bring a buffalo to its knees"
drag - something tedious and boring; "peeling potatoes is a drag"

tedium

Translations
ضَجَر، مَلَل
nudaúnavnost
kedsommelighedmonotoni
leiîindi
sıkıcılık

tedium

[ˈtiːdiəm] nennui m

tedium

nLang(e)weile f

tedious

(ˈtiːdiəs) adjective
boring and continuing for a long time. a tedious speech/speaker.
ˈtediously adverb
ˈtediousness noun
ˈtedium noun
boredom; tediousness. the tedium of a long journey.
References in classic literature ?
You will find no tedium of repetition in all their poetry, no thin vein of thought beaten out over endless pages.
On re-entering the cloister, the archdeacon found at the door of his cell his brother Jehan du Moulin, who was waiting for him, and who had beguiled the tedium of waiting by drawing on the wall with a bit of charcoal, a profile of his elder brother, enriched with a monstrous nose.
Hayward, after saying for a month that he was going South next day and delaying from week to week out of inability to make up his mind to the bother of packing and the tedium of a journey, had at last been driven off just before Christmas by the preparations for that festival.
Heaven knows what pains the author has been at, what bitter experiences he has endured and what heartache suffered, to give some chance reader a few hours' relaxation or to while away the tedium of a journey.
I dwell, even at the risk of tedium, on John's minutest errors, his case being so perplexing to the moralist; but we have done with them now, the roll is closed, the reader has the worst of our poor hero, and I leave him to judge for himself whether he or John has been the less deserving.
But it seemed these beer busts were a diversion of these high-spirited young fellows whereby they whiled away the tedium of existence by making fools of their betters.
As the omnibus contained only one other passenger, a sleepy old lady, Amy pocketed her veil and beguiled the tedium of the way by trying to find out where all her money had gone to.
Hepzibah troubled her auditor, moreover, by innumerable sins of emphasis, which he seemed to detect, without any reference to the meaning; nor, in fact, did he appear to take much note of the sense of what she read, but evidently felt the tedium of the lecture, without harvesting its profit.
It was to this part of the cap that the bells were attached; which circumstance, as well as the shape of his head-dress, and his own half-crazed, half-cunning expression of countenance, sufficiently pointed him out as belonging to the race of domestic clowns or jesters, maintained in the houses of the wealthy, to help away the tedium of those lingering hours which they were obliged to spend within doors.
It was no wonder, therefore, that he eagerly seized on the present opportunity to relieve the tedium of a ride between Albany and Schenectady.
But the tedium of his office reminded him more strongly of the willing scholar, and his thoughts were rambling from his pupils--it was plain.
Lady Eleanore Rochcliffe, who refused to wet her beautiful lips even with a bubble of Champagne, had sunk back into a large damask chair, apparently overwearied either with the excitement of the scene or its tedium, and while, for an instant, she was unconscious of voices, laughter and music, a young man stole forward, and knelt down at her feet.