teetotaller

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tee·to·tal·er

or tee·to·tal·ler  (tē′tōt′l-ər) also tee·to·tal·ist (-ĭst)
n.
One who abstains completely from alcoholic beverages.

tee·to′tal·ism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.teetotaller - a total abstainer
abstinent, nondrinker, abstainer - a person who refrains from drinking intoxicating beverages
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

teetotaller

noun abstainer, wowser (Austral. & N.Z. slang), nondrinker He's a strict teetotaller.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
abstinent-ka
afholdsmand
bindindismaîur
abstinent
alkol kullanmayan kimse

teetotaller

teetotaler (US) [ˈtiːˈtəʊtləʳ] N (= person) → abstemio/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

teetotaller

[ˌtiːˈtəʊtər] teetotaler (US) nabstinent(e) m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

teetotaller

, (US) teetotaler
nAbstinenzler(in) m(f), → Nichttrinker(in) m(f), → Antialkoholiker(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

teetotaller

teetotaler (Am) [ˈtiːˈtəʊtləʳ] n (person) → astemio/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

teetotal

(tiːˈtəutl) adjective
never taking alcoholic drink. The whole family is teetotal.
teeˈtotaller , (American) teeˈtotaler noun
a person who is teetotal.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
"I'm practically a teetotaller," he said, as he poured himself out a good half-tumbler of Canadian Club.
I do not consider that the cigars and whisky he consumed at my expense (he always refused cocktails, since he was practically a teetotaller), and the few dollars, borrowed with a civil air of conferring a favour upon me, that passed from my pocket to his, were in any way equivalent to the entertainment he afforded me.
And with all his success, and his evident satisfaction with his lot, the man was neither a prig nor a teetotaller. He had probably seen too much of the world to be either.
He pays his rent to the tick; he is practically a teetotaller; he is tirelessly kind with the younger children, and can keep them amused for a day on end; and, last and most urgent of all, he has made himself equally popular with the eldest daughter, who is ready to go to church with him tomorrow."
The only part of the population in Great Britain for whom not drinking has become less popular is the 65-plus age group, where the share of teetotallers has fallen from 29.4% in 2005 to 24.2% in 2017.
Previous research over the years has suggested ordinary tea is beneficial to health, a glass of red wine can improve blood flow, moderate beer drinkers were less likely to die than teetotallers, experts recommended drinking eight glasses of water a day, and I grew up being told milk was good for me.
IN the current economic gloom, the price of a beer in Slovenia should bring a smile to the face of even teetotallers.
Greedy promoters should not be allowed to penalise drivers and teetotallers with an outrageous mark up of 200 per cent on retail prices.
Teetotallers may miss some excitements in life, but they get great returns on savings.
Surveying policies over 10, 15, 20 and 25 years, the MM survey says few investors beat those lucky teetotallers. Policies run by Healthy Investment (HI) Friendly Society - formerly the Rechabite Friendly Society for teetotallers only - top the performance league in three sectors, and comes third in the fourth.
US scientists found that those aged between 70 and 81 who quaffed a drink every day tended to have the mental agility of someone 18 months younger than teetotallers.
Mr Quinn, who is also a member of the Western Health Board, said that non-alcoholic drinks used to be placed on tables for teetotallers but said that his favourite tipple, orange, had now "turned into wine".