telegony


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telegony

(tɪˈlɛɡənɪ)
n
(Genetics) genetics the supposed influence of a previous sire on offspring borne by a female to other sires
[C19: from tele- + -gony. Compare Greek tēlegonos 'born far from one's homeland']
telegonic, teˈlegonous adj

telegony

the supposed transmission of hereditary characteristics from one sire to offspring subsequently born to other sires by the same female. — telegonic, adj.
See also: Heredity
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Six epics with the "Iliad" and the "Odyssey" made up the Trojan Cycle -- The "Cyprian Lays", the "Iliad", the "Aethiopis", the "Little Illiad", the "Sack of Troy", the "Returns", the "Odyssey", and the "Telegony".
The answer to these questions was supplied by the "Telegony", a poem in two books by Eugammon of Cyrene (fl.
The theory is known as ' telegony' and was first proposed by Aristotle in ancient Greece.
(2001, 434, lines 7-12) (13) In this area, the heredity debate takes on an unfortunate racial connotation, as to show that somatic cells can influence reproductive cells, Spencer invokes the concept of "telegony"--the belief that the first man to impregnate a woman influences all subsequent children even if he is not involved in their conception.
The idea that a male can influence the traits in future offspring of a female with which he had once mated is called "telegony." Telegony was first applied to the Greek gods who were thought to be able to work their wiles with human women and later affect future children produced by these women even when their next husbands were mere mortals.