teleology

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tel·e·ol·o·gy

 (tĕl′ē-ŏl′ə-jē, tē′lē-)
n. pl. tel·e·ol·o·gies
1. The philosophical interpretation of natural phenomena as exhibiting purpose or design.
2. The use of ultimate purpose or design as a means of explaining phenomena.
3. Belief in or the perception of purposeful development toward an end, as in history.

[Greek teleios, teleos, perfect, complete (from telos, end, result; see kwel- in Indo-European roots) + -logy.]

tel′e·o·log′i·cal (-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), tel′e·o·log′ic (-ĭk) adj.
tel′e·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
tel′e·ol′o·gist n.

teleology

(ˌtɛlɪˈɒlədʒɪ; ˌtiːlɪ-)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the doctrine that there is evidence of purpose or design in the universe, and esp that this provides proof of the existence of a Designer
b. the belief that certain phenomena are best explained in terms of purpose rather than cause
c. the systematic study of such phenomena. See also final cause
2. (Philosophy) biology the belief that natural phenomena have a predetermined purpose and are not determined by mechanical laws
[C18: from New Latin teleologia, from Greek telos end + -logy]
teleological, ˌteleoˈlogic adj
ˌteleoˈlogically adv
ˌteleˈologism n
ˌteleˈologist n

tel•e•ol•o•gy

(ˌtɛl iˈɒl ə dʒi, ˌti li-)

n.
1. the doctrine that final causes exist.
2. the study of the evidences of design or purpose in nature.
3. such design or purpose.
4. the belief that purpose and design are a part of or are apparent in nature.
5. (in vitalist philosophy) the doctrine that phenomena are guided not only by mechanical forces but that they also move toward certain goals of self-realization.
[1730–40; < New Latin teleologia (1728); see teleo-]
tel`e•o•log′i•cal (-əˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) tel`e•o•log′ic, adj.
tel`e•o•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
tel`e•ol′o•gist, n.

teleology

- The study of design in nature; the word's basic meaning is "the study of ends or purposes"—attempts to understand the purpose of a natural occurrence by looking at its results.
See also related terms for purposes.

teleology

1. the doctrine that final causes (purposes) exist.
2. the study of the evidences of design or purpose in nature.
3. such a design or purpose.
4. the belief that purpose and design are a part of or apparent in nature.
5. Vitalism. the doctrine that phenomena are guided by both mechanical forces and goals of self-realization. Cf. entelechy.teleologist, n.teleologie, teleological, adj.
See also: Philosophy

teleology

The philosophical doctrine of final causes, or the interpretation of things in terms of purpose.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.teleology - (philosophy) a doctrine explaining phenomena by their ends or purposes
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Translations
teleologie

teleology

[ˌtelɪˈɒlədʒɪ] Nteleología f

teleology

nTeleologie f

teleology

[ˌtɛlɪˈɒlədʒɪ] nteleologia
References in periodicals archive ?
Coanda's programme has a romantic aim, reminding us of Novalis's and Blake's teleologic worldviews: the purpose of man as a cosmic being (as a being totally integrated into the cosmos) is the conquest of nature and of time itself (Firoiu 1971: 285, 286)--in this acceptation, man is the quester through illusions, aiming to find reality.
The teleologic explanation for the high concentration during childhood is the need for phosphorus to facilitate growth.
Though the future may not be entirely clear, it is evident from the ladder that the future will continue to deliver the gifts of evolutionary progress such as wisdom and justice and, further, that there is indeed a teleologic line between the past and the future [.
Some of the texts I examine seek women's perspectives as alternatives to mainstream, policy-oriented studies that focus on male agents and provocateurs (Afary); others consider gender and/or sexuality as primary lenses through which the region, its people, and its religion have been perceived by the West (Najmabadi, Moallem); and some unproblematically deploy the teleologic of Western modernity in an effort to prove its existence in contemporary Iran (Afary, Mahdavi).
As in the case of Said's Palestine, where the "'complete consort danc[es] together' contrapuntally," so in Agamben's coming community the war between the Jews and Palestinian to, and in behalf of, the End in the vocational teleologic of the nation-state metamorphoses into a radically secular, opened-ended, intimate, and creative-playfulstrife between 'peoples"--a community of "whatever singularities"--which is to say, into "means without end" or potentiality as such.