teleprinter


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Related to teleprinter: telegraph

tel·e·print·er

 (tĕl′ə-prĭn′tər)
n.
A teletypewriter.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

teleprinter

(ˈtɛlɪˌprɪntə)
n
1. (Telecommunications) a telegraph apparatus consisting of a keyboard transmitter, which converts a typed message into coded pulses for transmission along a wire or cable, and a printing receiver, which converts incoming signals and prints out the message. US name: teletypewriter See also telex, radioteletype
2. (Telecommunications) a network of such devices, formerly used for communicating information, etc
3. (Computer Science) a similar device used for direct input/output of data into a computer at a distant location
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tel•e•print•er

(ˈtɛl əˌprɪn tər)

n.
a teletypewriter.
[1925–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.teleprinter - a character printer connected to a telegraph that operates like a typewriterteleprinter - a character printer connected to a telegraph that operates like a typewriter
character printer, character-at-a-time printer, serial printer - a printer that prints a single character at a time
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
طابِعَه عَن بُعْد
dálnopis
fjernskriver
telex
fjarriti
teletaipas
teletaips
ďalekopis

teleprinter

[ˈtelɪˌprɪntəʳ] Nteletipo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

teleprinter

[ˈtɛliprɪntər] ntéléscripteur m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

teleprinter

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

teleprinter

[ˈtɛlɪˌprɪntəʳ] ntelescrivente f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

teleprinter

(ˈteliprintə) noun
telegraph system or instrument by which messages are sent out at one place, and received and printed at another.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are even earlier artistic uses of the teleprinter to be found, such as French lettrist Isidore Isou's "telescripteur" from the early 1960s (Bandini, 2003).
John Wetter, volunteer at the National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park, added: "My colleague was scanning eBay and he saw a photograph of what seemed to be the teleprinter."
There were once 200 Lorenz teleprinters and cipher coding machines, but almost all of them have been destroyed, the Telegraph said.
2 at 8:34 p.m., a teleprinter at Johnson's ranch delivered an FBI report on the embassy wiretap: Chennault had told South Vietnam's ambassador ''she had received a message from her boss (not further identified).
It was further proposed to set up at the MINITRACK site a teleprinter that would be linked to the Moonwatch teams, the Precision optical-tracking station at Olifantsfontein (also known as the Baker-Nunn station or SC2) and the Marconi Cable and Wireless Station in Cape Town.
The history of teletype begins with the teleprinter. Teleprinters evolved through a series of inventions by a number of engineers, including Royal Earl House, David Edward Hughes, Emile Baudot, Donald Murray, Charles Krum, Edward Kleinschmidt and Frederick G.
I rang Sky Sports to check that their results teleprinter wasn't on the blink.
I rushed to the teleprinter and read the incredible words: 'Gandhi shot'.
"Have you heard the news?" At that precise moment, an ancient teleprinter in one corner of the room began to rattle, and paper started to scroll through it.