televisual

(redirected from televisually)

televisual

(ˌtɛlɪˈvɪʒʊəl; -zjʊ-)
adj
(Broadcasting) relating to, shown on, or suitable for production on television
ˌteleˈvisually adv
Translations

televisual

[telɪˈvɪzjʊəl] ADJ (Brit) → televisivo

televisual

adjFernseh-, TV-; to make televisual historyFernsehgeschichte or TV-Geschichte machen
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References in periodicals archive ?
And not just in print, but also as Harry Enfield might say, in one of his familiar guises, 'televisually'.
Ah, September, how glorious to see you - televisually, if not in the deliberating whether to turn the thermostat up sense.
Televisually, the Salmond show got off to a good start.
Pynchon's description of this unlikely conclusion begins with another instance of televisually inspired boundary confusion.
And simply listening to a live concert rather than watch it unfold televisually proved strangely compelling.
Hence, this novella in Perez's signature style televisually created the emergent Bollywoodized landscape that brought together BRICs and Bollywood.
To demonstrate this televisually 'safe' silencing of more challenging realities, the later section of this article will focus on stage 1 of the RCIRCSA's 'Case 28' from Victoria's rural township of Ballarat, the most well publicised of the Royal Commission's case studies.
this pattern of the appearance of a televisually mediated South occur
the alleged manufacture of telegenic death by the Palestinians implies their subjugated knowledge of genocidal truth that both attracts and threatens Netanyahu--for in a Euro-American public sphere acculturated to the Holocaust, Palestinians become more attractive and rhetorically persuasive when dead than when alive, when televisually spiritualized rather than when protesting or resisting or simply enduring intractable prison-house materialities.
This year, for the very first time, my three-year-old daughter has been beholden to the same cause and effect, televisually transfixed and pointing at the screen as she trots out the words 'I want that one' like a pint-sized version of Andy from Little Britain.
This year, for the first time, my three-year-old daughter has been beholden to the same cause and effect, televisually transfixed and pointing at the screen as she trots out the words 'I want that one' like a pint-sized zombified version of Andy from Little Britain.
Meanwhile, Euro 2012 is the first major football championship The Huddle Sports Bar and Grill at the Citymax Hotel, Al Barsha, has covered televisually.