tellurium


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tel·lu·ri·um

 (tĕ-lo͝or′ē-əm)
n. Symbol Te
A brittle, silvery-white, rare metallic element usually found in combination with gold and other metals, produced commercially as a byproduct of the electrolytic refining of copper and used in compact discs, semiconductors, ceramics, and blasting caps and (in the form of bismuth telluride) in thermoelectric devices. In alloys it improves the machinability of stainless steel or copper, and increases the durability and hardness of lead. Atomic number 52; atomic weight 127.60; melting point 449.5°C; boiling point 988°C; specific gravity 6.23 (20°C); valence 2, 4, 6. See Periodic Table.

[From Latin tellūs, tellūr-, earth (by contrast with uranium, under a conception of the latter as an element of the heavens because of its being named after the planet Uranus).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tellurium

(tɛˈlʊərɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a brittle silvery-white nonmetallic element occurring both uncombined and in combination with metals: used in alloys of lead and copper and as a semiconductor. Symbol: Te; atomic no: 52; atomic wt: 127.60; valency: 2, 4, or 6; relative density: 6.24; melting pt: 449.57±0.3°C; boiling pt: 988°C
[C19: New Latin, from Latin tellūs the earth, formed by analogy with uranium]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tel•lu•ri•um

(tɛˈlʊər i əm)

n.
a rare, crystalline, silver-white element: used in the manufacture of alloys and as a coloring agent in glass and ceramics. Symbol: Te; at. wt.: 127.60; at. no.: 52; sp. gr.: 6.24.
[< German (1798) < Latin tellūr-, s. of tellūs earth + New Latin -ium -ium2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

tel·lu·ri·um

(tĕ-lo͝or′ē-əm)
Symbol Te A nonmetallic element that occurs as either a brittle, shiny, silvery-white crystal or a gray or brown powder. Small amounts of tellurium are used to improve the alloys of various metals. Atomic number 52. See Periodic Table.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tellurium - a brittle silver-white metalloid element that is related to selenium and sulfurtellurium - a brittle silver-white metalloid element that is related to selenium and sulfur; it is used in alloys and as a semiconductor; occurs mainly as tellurides in ores of copper and nickel and silver and gold
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
graphic tellurium, sylvanite - a silver-white mineral consisting of silver gold telluride; a source of gold in Australia and America
telluride - any binary compound of tellurium with other more electropositive elements
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
tellur
tellur
teluro
telluur
telluuri
telurij
tellúr
tellúr
テルル
telūras
telluur
tellur
tellur
telur
telur
tellur
tellür

tellurium

[teˈlʊərɪəm] Ntelurio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tellurium

n (Chem) → Tellur nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Chemists look at reagents containing the less researched (compared to sulfur) chalcogen elements selenium and tellurium. Though they do review fundamental aspects, their emphasis is on recent developments.
"One of them is liquid tellurium, a key element of the PCM materials.
This is&nbsp;why the group took&nbsp;988 Tellurium dioxide crystals to monitor at the CUORE observatory.
The design type chosen was a Hyper-Graeco-Latin Square (table 1) in which combinations of all three elements and four types of sulfur based curatives/accelerators, plus two types of selenium and two types of tellurium based curatives/accelerators were employed in various combinations.
Tellurium (Te) was purchased from Koch-Light Laboratories Ltd., Colnbrook, Berkshire, England.
"The plant's operation will release into the atmosphere minor quantities of heavy metals, like gold, copper, lead, iron, tellurium, bismuth, selenium, and mercury," the LID's letter of response to the municipal council said.
The patents are for the development, manufacturing and use of pastes having tellurium containing glass frit in the paste compositions.
Fifteen chapters cover sample pretreatment methods for organometallics; separation techniques for elemental speciation; speciation analysis; selenium, chromium, vanadium, thallium, antimony, arsenic, mercury, zinc, tin, iodine, and tellurium in different matrices; trace elements; human health.
[1] by a reaction of alkaline aqueous solutions dissolving elemental tellurium and iron (II) complex [Na.sub.2][Fe(EDTA)] at 140[degrees]C under atmospheric pressure, while Liu et al.
Tellurium (Te) is an element sharing the same group of sulfur and selenium in the periodic table; that is, it is the heaviest of the stable chalcogens (group 16) and is classified as a metalloid.
In this study, selenium and tellurium were electrochemically deposited onto flat Ti[O.sub.2] layers, resulting in the simple superstrate structure and simple process solar cells.