temperamentally


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Related to temperamentally: vindictiveness, unhinging

tem·per·a·men·tal

 (tĕm′prə-mĕn′tl, tĕm′pər-ə-)
adj.
1. Relating to or caused by temperament: our temperamental differences.
2. Excessively sensitive or irritable; moody.
3. Likely to perform unpredictably; undependable: a temperamental motor.

tem′per·a·men′tal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.temperamentally - by temperament; "temperamentally suited to each other"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
بصورَةٍ إنْفِعالِيَّهمِزاجِيّا، من ناحِيَة المِزاج
popudlivěsvou přirozenostívznětlivě
opfarende
alkatilag
á duttlungafullan háttskapgerîarlega
povahovo
huy/yaradılış açısındankolay heyecanlanan

temperamentally

[ˌtempərəˈmentəlɪ] ADV (by nature) he's temperamentally suited/unsuited to this jobpor naturaleza sirve/no sirve para hacer este trabajo
temperamentally, he is more likeen cuanto a temperamento, se parece más a ...
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

temperamentally

[ˌtɛmpərəˈmɛntəli] adv (= by nature) to be temperamentally unsuited to sth → ne pas être fait(e) pour faire qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

temperamentally

adv
behave etctemperamentvoll, launenhaft (pej)
(of machine, car)launisch (hum)
(= as regards disposition)charakterlich, veranlagungsmäßig; to be temperamentally averse to somethingeiner Sache (dat)vom Temperament her abgeneigt sein
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

temperament

(ˈtempərəmənt) noun
a person's natural way of thinking, behaving etc. She has a sweet/nervous temperament.
ˌtemperaˈmental (-ˈmen-) adjective
emotional; excitable; showing quick changes of mood.
ˌtemperaˈmentally (-ˈmen-) adverb
1. by or according to one's temperament. She is temperamentally unsuited to this job.
2. excitably. She behaved very temperamentally yesterday.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
She is handsome, energetic, executive, but to me she seems unimpressionable and temperamentally incapable of enthusiasm.
Michael possessed no trace of hysteria, though he was more temperamentally excitable and explosive than his blood-brother Jerry, while his father and mother were a sedate old couple indeed compared with him.
And I enjoyed it temperamentally in a chair, my feet up on the sill of the open window, a book in my hands and the murmured harmonies of wind and sun in my heart making an accompaniment to the rhythms of my author.
Dr Hirsch, though born in France and covered with the most triumphant favours of French education, was temperamentally of another type--mild, dreamy, humane; and, despite his sceptical system, not devoid of transcendentalism.
And Mr Verloc, temperamentally identical with his associates, drew fine distinctions in his mind on the strength of insignificant differences.
He's soft mentally (Holy Toledo!), he's bloated temperamentally (Unholy Twitter feed!) and let's stop there, since I won't resort to his (highly ironical) penchant for body-shaming.
I have never learnt to drive, having been temperamentally unsuited to the wheel ever since a sister tipped me out of my pram during a race.
I see it as tragic irony that Paul VI, who was temperamentally the opposite of the megalomaniac Pius IX, ended up wielding the absolute power that Pius had craved.
'Some people, however long their experience or strong their intellect, are temperamentally incapable of reaching firm decisions.' - British Prime Minister James Callaghan died on March 26, 2005
Often it is seen that women can handle managerial positions better than men because they are temperamentally calmer and able to multi-task, if they are supported and trained.
He's one that always stands out as physically and temperamentally mature beyond his 19 years.
Temperamentally he was a quiet good-natured humble artist who shied away from publicity.