temperance


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Related to temperance: Temperance movement

tem·per·ance

 (tĕm′pər-əns, tĕm′prəns)
n.
1. Abstinence from or moderation in drinking alcoholic beverages. See Synonyms at abstinence.
2. Moderation and self-restraint, as in behavior or expression.

temperance

(ˈtɛmpərəns)
n
1. restraint or moderation, esp in yielding to one's appetites or desires
2. abstinence from alcoholic drink
[C14: from Latin temperantia, from temperāre to regulate]

tem•per•ance

(ˈtɛm pər əns, ˈtɛm prəns)

n.
1. moderation or self-restraint; self-control.
2. habitual moderation in any indulgence, appetite, etc.
3. total abstinence from alcoholic liquors.

Temperance

 of cooks: a company of cooks—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486.

Temperance

 

on the wagon Abstaining from alcoholic beverages; said of a teetotaler or nephalist. This expression is a truncated version of the earlier and more explicit on the water-wagon.

But, R-e-m-o-r-s-e!
The water-wagon is the place for me;
It is no time for mirth and laughter,
The cold, gray dawn of the morning after!
(George Ade, Remorse, 1902)

Antithetically, off the wagon implies the resumption of alcoholic indulgence after a period of abstinence.

Like the bartenders, they fell off the wagon. (A. J. Liebling, “Yea, Verily,”in The New Yorker, September 27, 1952)

teetotal To abstain totally from alcoholic beverages; as an adjective, advocating total abstinence from intoxicating drink. This word is formed by a reduplication of the initial sound of total. It was purportedly coined by Richard Turner (1790-1846) in a speech delivered in England in September, 1833, advocating total abstinence from liquor. Accounts differ as to whether teetotal was intentional as Turner claimed, or the result of a speech defect which caused Turner to stutter, “N-n-nothing but t-t-t-total abstinence will do.” At any rate, John Livesey, a member of the audience and founder of the Total Abstinence Society, credits the word to Turner in his Autobiography (1867), and Turner’s gravestone epitaph reads in part: “Richard Turner, author of the word Teetotal as applied to abstinence from all intoxicating liquors.” Furthermore, a full-page advertisement in the April, 1836, issue of Preston’s Temperance Advocate also credits “Dicky Turner”as the originator of teetotal.

Rev. Joel Jewell, secretary of a temperance society in Lansing, New York, claimed that members of his organization coined the word in 1827 when they handed out pledge cards upon which were printed “O.P.” (Old Pledge—partial abstinence) or “T.” (Total abstinence), encouraging people to sign the latter by crying out “T—total! T—total!”

Although both England and the United States claim credit for the word, it is possible that teetotal developed independently in the two countries. It has since enjoyed extensive and frequent use.

Much stress has been laid by the teetotal advocates on the paramount influence of parental intemperance on the procreation of a mentally deficient progeny. (Thomas Allbutt, A System of Medicine, 1899)

One who abstains from alcoholic consumption is often called a teetotaler.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.temperance - the trait of avoiding excessestemperance - the trait of avoiding excesses  
natural virtue - (scholasticism) one of the four virtues (prudence, justice, fortitude, and temperance) derived from nature
restraint, control - discipline in personal and social activities; "he was a model of polite restraint"; "she never lost control of herself"
dryness, sobriety - moderation in or abstinence from alcohol or other drugs
abstemiousness - moderation in eating and drinking
intemperance - the quality of being intemperate
2.temperance - abstaining from excess
abstinence - act or practice of refraining from indulging an appetite
3.temperance - the act of tempering
compounding, combining, combination - the act of combining things to form a new whole

temperance

noun
1. teetotalism, abstinence, sobriety, abstemiousness a reformed alcoholic extolling the joys of temperance
2. moderation, restraint, self-control, self-discipline, continence, self-restraint, forbearance The age of hedonism was replaced by a new era of temperance.
moderation excess, intemperance, overindulgence, prodigality, immoderation
Quotations
"Temperance is the greatest of all the virtues" [Plutarch Moralia]

temperance

noun
1. Avoidance of extremes of opinion, feeling, or personal conduct:
2. The practice of refraining from use of alcoholic liquors:
Translations

temperance

[ˈtempərəns]
A. N
1. (= moderation) → templanza f (frm), moderación f
2. (= teetotalism) → abstinencia f de bebidas alcohólicas
B. CPD temperance hotel Nhotel m donde no se sirven bebidas alcohólicas
temperance movement Ncampaña f antialcohólica

temperance

[ˈtɛmpərəns] n
(= abstinence from alcohol) → tempérance f
(= moderation) → modération f

temperance

n
(= moderation)Mäßigung f; (in speech etc) → Zurückhaltung f; (in eating, drinking) → Maßhalten nt, → Mäßigung f
(= teetotalism)Enthaltsamkeit f, → Abstinenz f

temperance

:
temperance hotel
temperance movement
nTemperenzler- or Temperenzbewegung f
temperance society
nTemperenzverein mor -gesellschaft f

temperance

[ˈtɛmprns] n (frm) (self-control) → moderazione f; (in drinking) → temperanza nel bere; (teetotalism) → astinenza dal bere
References in classic literature ?
He had the strangest companions imaginable; men with long beards, and dressed in linen blouses, and other such new-fangled and ill-fitting garments; reformers, temperance lecturers, and all manner of cross-looking philanthropists; community-men, and come-outers, as Hepzibah believed, who acknowledged no law, and ate no solid food, but lived on the scent of other people's cookery, and turned up their noses at the fare.
Yet Dives himself, he too lives like a Czar in an ice palace made of frozen sighs, and being a president of a temperance society, he only drinks the tepid tears of orphans.
And after supper he talked to him about temperance and such things till the old man cried, and said he'd been a fool, and fooled away his life; but now he was a-going to turn over a new leaf and be a man nobody wouldn't be ashamed of, and he hoped the judge would help him and not look down on him.
TOM joined the new order of Cadets of Temperance, being attracted by the showy character of their "regalia.
We came on the cars from Temperance yesterday, slept all night at my cousin's, and drove from her house--eight miles it is--this morning.
But Knowledge is as food, and needs no less Her Temperance over Appetite, to know In measure what the mind may well contain, Oppresses else with Surfet, and soon turns Wisdom to Folly, as Nourishment to Winde.
The Prior had his own reasons, however, for persevering in the course of temperance which he had adopted.
Shortly after this change in his circumstances he became an advocate of thrift, temperance, and steady industry, and quitted the International Association, of which he had been an enthusiastic supporter when dependent on his own skill and taste as a working mason.
In choosing persons for all employments, they have more regard to good morals than to great abilities; for, since government is necessary to mankind, they believe, that the common size of human understanding is fitted to some station or other; and that Providence never intended to make the management of public affairs a mystery to be comprehended only by a few persons of sublime genius, of which there seldom are three born in an age: but they suppose truth, justice, temperance, and the like, to be in every man's power; the practice of which virtues, assisted by experience and a good intention, would qualify any man for the service of his country, except where a course of study is required.
Having invited him to sup and pass the night with me, I set before him some excellent mead, which he liked so well as to drink somewhat beyond the bounds of exact temperance.
To this section belong economists, philanthropists, humanitarians, improvers of the condition of the working class, organisers of charity, members of societies for the prevention of cruelty to animals, temperance fanatics, hole-and-corner reformers of every imaginable kind.
A temperance lecturer saw him, and wrought poor David into the texture of his evening's discourse, as an awful instance of dead drunkenness by the roadside.