temperature


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to temperature: body temperature

tem·per·a·ture

 (tĕm′pər-ə-cho͝or′, -chər, tĕm′prə-)
n.
1.
a. The degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment.
b. A measure of the average kinetic energy of the particles in a sample of matter, expressed in terms of units or degrees designated on a standard scale.
2.
a. The degree of heat in the body of a living organism, usually about 37.0°C (98.6°F) in humans.
b. An abnormally high condition of body heat caused by illness; a fever.

[Middle English, temperate weather, Latin temperātūra, due measure, from temperātus, past participle of temperāre, to mix; see temper.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

temperature

(ˈtɛmprɪtʃə)
n
1. (General Physics) the degree of hotness of a body, substance, or medium; a physical property related to the average kinetic energy of the atoms or molecules of a substance
2. (General Physics) a measure of this degree of hotness, indicated on a scale that has one or more fixed reference points
3. (Pathology) informal a body temperature in excess of the normal
4. archaic
a. compromise
b. temperament
c. temperance
[C16 (originally: a mingling): from Latin temperātūra proportion, from temperāre to temper]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tem•per•a•ture

(ˈtɛm pər ə tʃər, -ˌtʃʊər, -prə-, -pər tʃər, -ˌtʃʊər)

n.
1. a measure of the warmth or coldness of an object or substance with reference to some standard value.
2.
a. the degree of heat in a living body, normally about 98.6°F (37°C) in humans.
b. a level of such heat above the normal; fever: running a temperature.
3. Obs. mildness, as of the weather.
4. Obs. temperament.
[1525–35; < Latin temperātūra blending, tempering. See temperate, -ure]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

tem·per·a·ture

(tĕm′pər-ə-cho͝or′)
1. A measure of the average kinetic energy of atoms or molecules in a system.
2. A numerical measure of hotness or coldness on a standard scale, such as the Kelvin scale. See Note at Celsius.
3. An abnormally high body temperature; a fever.
Usage The molecules of all substances are in motion, and the energy associated with this motion is called kinetic energy. Temperature and heat are both ways of measuring this energy, but they do not mean the same thing. A substance's temperature is the average kinetic energy of the substance's molecules. By contrast, a substance's heat is the total amount of energy contained in the substance. Thus, the water in two different pots, one four times as large as the other, might be at the same temperature, but the water in the larger pot would contain four times as much heat, since it requires four times as much energy to raise the temperature to the temperature of the water in the smaller pot.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

temperature

1. Degree of “hotness” measured in Celsius, Fahrenheit, etc.
2. A measure of temperature difference representing a single division on a temperature scale.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.temperature - the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment (corresponding to its molecular activity)temperature - the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment (corresponding to its molecular activity)
physical property - any property used to characterize matter and energy and their interactions
absolute temperature - temperature measured on the absolute scale
absolute zero - (cryogenics) the lowest temperature theoretically attainable (at which the kinetic energy of atoms and molecules is minimal); 0 Kelvin or -273.15 centigrade or -459.67 Fahrenheit
Curie point, Curie temperature - the temperature above which a ferromagnetic substance loses its ferromagnetism and becomes paramagnetic
dew point - the temperature at which the water vapor in the air becomes saturated and condensation begins
flash point, flashpoint - the lowest temperature at which the vapor of a combustible liquid can be ignited in air
freezing point, melting point - the temperature below which a liquid turns into a solid
boiling point - the temperature at which a liquid boils at sea level; "they brought the water to a boil"
mercury - temperature measured by a mercury thermometer; "the mercury was falling rapidly"
room temperature - the normal temperature of room in which people live
simmer - temperature just below the boiling point; "the stew remained at a simmer for hours"
blood heat, body temperature - temperature of the body; normally 98.6 F or 37 C in humans; usually measured to obtain a quick evaluation of a person's health
low temperature, cold, frigidity, frigidness, coldness - the absence of heat; "the coldness made our breath visible"; "come in out of the cold"; "cold is a vasoconstrictor"
high temperature, hotness, heat - the presence of heat
fundamental measure, fundamental quantity - one of the four quantities that are the basis of systems of measurement
2.temperature - the somatic sensation of cold or heat
somaesthesia, somatesthesia, somatic sensation, somesthesia - the perception of tactual or proprioceptive or gut sensations; "he relied on somesthesia to warn him of pressure changes"
warmth, heat - the sensation caused by heat energy
coldness, cold - the sensation produced by low temperatures; "he shivered from the cold"; "the cold helped clear his head"
comfort zone - the temperature range (between 28 and 30 degrees Centigrade) at which the naked human body is able to maintain a heat balance without shivering or sweating
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
حَرارَة الجِسِمدَرَجَةُ الـحَرَارَةدَرَجَة حَرارَه
teplota
temperaturfeber
lämpötilakuume
temperatura
hõmérséklethőmérsékletláz
hitihiti, hitastig
温度
온도
matuoti kam temperatūrą
temperatūra
febrătemperatură
temperaturavročina
temperaturfeber
อุณหภูมิ
nhiệt độ

temperature

[ˈtemprɪtʃəʳ]
A. N
1. (Met) → temperatura f
2. (Med) (= high temperature) → calentura f, fiebre f
to have or run a temperaturetener fiebre or calentura
she has a temperature of 103°tiene 39° de fiebre
to take sb's temperaturetomar la temperatura a algn
B. CPD temperature chart Ngráfico m de temperaturas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

temperature

[ˈtɛmpərətʃər]
n
[air, water, place, room, oven] → température f
The temperature was 30 degrees
BUT Il faisait trente degrés.
[body] → température f
to take sb's temperature → prendre la température de qn
to have a temperature → avoir de la fièvre
to be running a temperature → avoir de la fièvre
modif [controls, reading] → de la température; [difference, drop, rise] → de températuretemperature chart n [patient] → feuille f de températuretemperature gauge nindicateur m de température
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

temperature

nTemperatur f; (Med, above normal temperature also) → Fieber nt; water boils at a temperature of 100° CWasser kocht bei einer Temperatur von 100° C; to take somebody’s temperaturejds Temperatur messen, bei jdm Fieber messen; he has a temperatureer hat Fieber; he has a slight/high temperature, he’s running a slight/high temperatureer hat erhöhte Temperatur/hohes Fieber; he has a temperature of 39° Cer hat 39° Fieber

temperature

:
temperature chart
n (Med) → Fiebertabelle f; (= curve of graph)Fieberkurve f
temperature gauge
nTemperaturanzeiger m
temperature-sensitive
adjtemperaturempfindlich
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

temperature

[ˈtɛmprɪtʃəʳ] ntemperatura
to have or run a temperature → avere la febbre
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

temperature

(ˈtemprətʃə) noun
1. the amount or degree of cold or heat. The food must be kept at a low temperature.
2. a level of body heat that is higher than normal. She had a temperature and wasn't feeling well.
take someone's temperature
to measure a person's body heat, using a thermometer.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

temperature

دَرَجَةُ الـحَرَارَة teplota temperatur Temperatur θερμοκρασία temperatura lämpötila température temperatura temperatura 温度 온도 temperatuur temperatur temperatura temperatura температура temperatur อุณหภูมิ ısı nhiệt độ 温度
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

tem·per·a·ture

1. n. temperatura, grado de calor o frío de un cuerpo o masa.
2. Condición anormal de frío o calor de un organismo.
high ______ alta;
[fiebre] calentura;
low ______ baja.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

temperature

n temperatura; (fam, fever) fiebre f, calentura; axillary — temperatura axilar; oral — temperatura oral; rectal — temperatura rectal; room — temperatura ambiente; to take (someone's) — tomar(le) la temperatura (a alguien); to take one's (own) tomarse la temperatura; Did you take your temperature at home?..¿Se tomó la temperatura en casa?
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
"Well, you'd better let me take your temperature," said Griffiths.
The cracking and booming of the ice indicate a change of temperature. One pleasant morning after a cold night, February 24th, 1850, having gone to Flint's Pond to spend the day, I noticed with surprise, that when I struck the ice with the head of my axe, it resounded like a gong for many rods around, or as if I had struck on a tight drum-head.
They necessarily consumed a certain quantity of gas, for they were obliged to keep the producing substance at a temperature of above 400@.
THE TEMPERATURE of the regions west of the Rocky Mountains is much milder than in the same latitudes on the Atlantic side; the upper plains, however, which lie at a distance from the sea-coast, are subject in winter to considerable vicissitude; being traversed by lofty "sierras," crowned with perpetual snow, which often produce flaws and streaks of intense cold This was experienced by Captain Bonneville and his companions in their progress westward.
Its physical condition is still largely a mystery, but we know now that even in its equatorial region the midday temperature barely approaches that of our coldest winter.
The air of the apartments is forced to pass through its pipes, and is then released with a heightened temperature. Well, what I have just described to you is nothing more nor less than a calorifere.
If we succeed in so doing before we reach the higher internal temperature we may even yet survive.
- Birds.- Reptiles - Climate West of the Mountains - Mildness of the Temperature.- Soil of the Coast and the Interior.
If I were a natural philosopher, I would tell him that if less of caloric were set in motion upon the planets which are nearest to the sun, and more, on the contrary, upon those which are farthest removed from it, this simple fact would alone suffice to equalize the heat, and to render the temperature of those worlds supportable by beings organized like ourselves.
Each molecule of the gutter bore away a molecule of heat radiating from Gringoire's loins, and the equilibrium between the temperature of his body and the temperature of the brook, began to be established in rough fashion.
Some idea of the significance of this may be gained by conceiving of an equal difference of temperature in the opposite direction.
During the first eleven days, whilst nature was dormant, the mean temperature taken from observations made every two hours on board the Beagle, was 51 degs.; and in the middle of the day the thermometer seldom ranged above 55 degs.