tenable

(redirected from tenably)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

ten·a·ble

 (tĕn′ə-bəl)
adj.
1. Capable of being maintained in argument; rationally defensible: a tenable theory.
2. Capable of being held against assault; defensible: a tenable outpost.
3. Capable of enduring or of being tolerated: a tenable situation.

[French, from Old French, from tenir, to hold, from Latin tenēre; see ten- in Indo-European roots.]

ten′a·bil′i·ty, ten′a·ble·ness n.
ten′a·bly adv.

tenable

(ˈtɛnəbəl)
adj
able to be upheld, believed, maintained, or defended
[C16: from Old French, from tenir to hold, from Latin tenēre]
ˌtenaˈbility, ˈtenableness n
ˈtenably adv

ten•a•ble

(ˈtɛn ə bəl)

adj.
capable of being held, maintained, or defended.
[1570–80; < French: that can be held =ten(ir) to hold (« Latin tenēre) + -able -able]
ten`a•bil′i•ty, ten′a•ble•ness, n.
ten′a•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tenable - based on sound reasoning or evidence; "well-founded suspicions"
reasonable, sensible - showing reason or sound judgment; "a sensible choice"; "a sensible person"

tenable

tenable

adjective
1. Capable of being justified:
2. Capable of being defended against armed attack:
Translations

tenable

[ˈtenəbl] ADJ [argument] → sostenible, defendible; [proposal] → válido

tenable

[ˈtɛnəbəl] adj [argument, position] → défendable

tenable

adj
(Mil) positionhaltbar; (fig) opinion, theoryhaltbar, vertretbar
pred a post tenable for lifeeine Lebensstellung, eine Stelle auf Lebenszeit; a post tenable for two yearseine auf zwei Jahre befristete Stelle

tenable

[ˈtɛnəbl] adjsostenibile
References in periodicals archive ?
From the origin of Christianity, people were so attracted by the joy they saw in the followers of Jesus that they eventually felt they no longer could tenably hold to their viewpoints and prior beliefs.
To say that the protagonist of Coconut simply embraces whiteness at the cost of blackness, thereby smoothening up post-nationalism to absolutist descriptions of whiteness and blackness, untenably misses the point made tenably by a writer like Phiri in a 2011 conference presentation, that "Coconut [.
show a fair probability that, in light of all the evidence, including that alleged to have been illegally admitted (but with due regard to any unreliability of it) and evidence tenably claimed to have been wrongly excluded or to have become available only after the trial, the trier of the facts would have entertained a reasonable doubt of his guilt.