tenacity


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te·na·cious

 (tə-nā′shəs)
adj.
1.
a. Extremely persistent in adhering to or doing something; stubborn or relentless: "tenacious defenders of their harsh and pitiless land" (Dee Brown).
b. Characterized by extreme persistence; relentless or enduring: tenacious detective work; tenacious superstitions.
2. Holding together firmly; cohesive: a tenacious material.
3. Clinging to another object or surface; adhesive: tenacious lint.
4. Tending to retain; retentive: a tenacious memory.

[From Latin tenāx, tenāc-, holding fast, from tenēre, to hold; see ten- in Indo-European roots.]

te·na′cious·ly adv.
te·nac′i·ty (tə-năs′ĭ-tē), te·na′cious·ness n.

te•nac•i•ty

(təˈnæs ɪ ti)

n.
the quality or property of being tenacious.
syn: See perseverance.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tenacity - persistent determinationtenacity - persistent determination    
determination, purpose - the quality of being determined to do or achieve something; firmness of purpose; "his determination showed in his every movement"; "he is a man of purpose"

tenacity

tenacity

noun
Translations

tenacity

[tɪˈnæsɪtɪ] Ntenacidad f

tenacity

[tɪˈnæsəti] nténacité f

tenacity

nZähigkeit f, → Hartnäckigkeit f; (of character, person also)Beharrlichkeit f; the tenacity of his gripsein eiserner Griff; his tenacity of purposeseine zielstrebige Beharrlichkeit

tenacity

[tɪˈnæsɪtɪ] ntenacia
References in classic literature ?
He had in the highest degree a practical tenacity which Pierre lacked, and without fuss or strain on his part this set things going.
From the glass windows in the drawing-room, I saw long seaweeds and gigantic fuci and varech, of which the open polar sea contains so many specimens, with their sharp polished filaments; they measured about 300 yards in length-- real cables, thicker than one's thumb; and, having great tenacity, they are often used as ropes for vessels.
One alone persisted with tender tenacity and deserved the name of "eternal fiance," a name he accepted with melancholy resignation; that was Monsieur Robert Darzac.
Mazarin, every morning, on opening his closet door, found the figure of Colbert like a sentinel behind the bench, and this disagreeable figure never failed to ask him humbly, but with tenacity, for the queen-mother's letter.
She was delighted to talk again of the country in which her youth was spent, and it was a pleasure to her to recall scenes and people that had remained in her memory with the tenacity peculiar to her class.
There was the tenacity with which he clung to the earth.
You are a person of prodigious tenacity of purpose.
The pilot, at first, did not seem to comprehend; he could scarcely realise so much determination and tenacity.
She had an active force of antagonism within her, when the antagonism turned on the defence either of plans or persons that she believed in; and the wrongs which she felt that Will had received from her husband, and the external conditions which to others were grounds for slighting him, only gave the more tenacity to her affection and admiring judgment.
The rivalry between them was soon apparent; it was entirely good natured on Gilbert's side; but it is much to be feared that the same thing cannot be said of Anne, who had certainly an unpraiseworthy tenacity for holding grudges.
This valuable metal possesses the whiteness of silver, the indestructibility of gold, the tenacity of iron, the fusibility of copper, the lightness of glass.
The savage man, and the savage beast, hunger, thirst, fatigue, and disease -- every impediment which Nature could place in the way, had all been overcome with Anglo-Saxon tenacity.