tenement

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ten·e·ment

 (tĕn′ə-mənt)
n.
1. A building for human habitation, especially one that is rented to tenants.
2. A rundown, low-rental apartment building whose facilities and maintenance barely meet minimum standards.
3. Chiefly British An apartment or room leased to a tenant.
4. Law A property of a permanent nature that is possessed or owned, such as land or a building, along with the rights associated with such possession or ownership.

[Middle English, house, from Old French, from Medieval Latin tenēmentum, from Latin tenēre, to hold; see ten- in Indo-European roots.]

ten′e·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.

tenement

(ˈtɛnəmənt)
n
1. (Human Geography) Also called: tenement building (now esp in Scotland) a large building divided into separate flats
2. a dwelling place or residence, esp one intended for rent
3. chiefly Brit a room or flat for rent
4. (Law) property law any form of permanent property, such as land, dwellings, offices, etc
[C14: from Medieval Latin tenementum, from Latin tenēre to hold]
tenemental, ˌteneˈmentary adj
ˈteneˌmented adj

ten•e•ment

(ˈtɛn ə mənt)

n.
1. Also called ten′ement house`. a run-down and often overcrowded apartment house, esp. in a poor section of a large city.
2. Law. property of a permanent or fixed nature, whether corporeal or incorporeal, as lands or rent.
3. Archaic. any abode or habitation.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Medieval Latin tenēmentum= Latin tenē(re) to hold + -mentum -ment]

tenement

- First meant "holding as a possession."
See also related terms for possession.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tenement - a run-down apartment house barely meeting minimal standardstenement - a run-down apartment house barely meeting minimal standards
apartment building, apartment house - a building that is divided into apartments
Translations

tenement

[ˈtenɪmənt]
A. Nvivienda f (Scot) (= flat) → piso m (Sp), departamento m (LAm)
B. CPD tenement block Nbloque m de pisos (Sp), bloque m de departamentos (LAm)
tenement house Ncasa f de vecinos, casa f de vecindad

tenement

[ˈtɛnəmənt] n
(also tenement building, tenement block) → immeuble m

tenement

n
(also tenement house)Mietshaus nt, → Mietskaserne f (pej)
(Jur) → Mietbesitz m; (= farm)Pachtbesitz m

tenement

[ˈtɛnɪmənt] ncasamento
References in periodicals archive ?
Giddy from the prospect of a potentially once-in-a-lifetime experience, and thinking I was funny, I posted the ticket to my friend's house in Glasgow addressing it to Munky Faz, then her flat number, tenament number and street.
The numerous apartment blocks that are being thrown up lack any real architectural courage and appear as bland tenament blocks of the future.
"Each contest wears a little love away," the article explained, "and with maturity comes an estrangement which tears and regrets cannot bridge." (27) Though "kind reproof and calm reasoning" are sometimes adequate to quell misbehavior, fathers should remember that each child's spirit inhabits a "bodily tenament" which also deserves loving parental attention.
Roman's first home as a baby was one room in a communal flat in a tenament block in Kaunas.
Apart from the size of the cast, the most difficult aspect of the play is the stark juxtapositon between the first act, full of the realistic bustle of Dublin tenament life familiar from O'Casey's earlier plays, with the second - an apocalyptic vision of the Western Front influenced by Expressionism, in which none of the characters introduced in the first act appears.