tenuity


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical.

te·nu·i·ty

 (tĕ-no͞o′ĭ-tē, -nyo͞o′-)
n.
The quality or condition of being tenuous; lack of thickness, density, or substance.

[Middle English tenuite, from Old French, from Latin tenuitās, thinness, from tenuis, thin; see tenuous.]

te•nu•i•ty

(təˈnu ɪ ti, -ˈnyu-, tɛ-)

n.
1. the state of being tenuous.
2. slenderness.
3. thinness of consistency; rarefied condition.
[1525–35; < Latin tenuitās thinness =tenui(s) (see tenuis) + -tās -ty2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tenuity - relatively small dimension through an object as opposed to its length or width; "the tenuity of a hair"; "the thinness of a rope"
dimension - the magnitude of something in a particular direction (especially length or width or height)
2.tenuity - a rarified quality; "the tenuity of the upper atmosphere"
density, denseness - the amount per unit size
3.tenuity - the quality of lacking intensity or substance; "a shrill yet sweet tenuity of voice"- Nathaniel Hawthorne
weakness - the property of lacking physical or mental strength; liability to failure under pressure or stress or strain; "his weakness increased as he became older"; "the weakness of the span was overlooked until it collapsed"
Translations

tenuity

[teˈnjʊɪtɪ] Ntenuidad f
References in classic literature ?
A cadaverousness of complexion; an eye large, liquid, and luminous beyond comparison; lips somewhat thin and very pallid, but of a surpassingly beautiful curve; a nose of a delicate Hebrew model, but with a breadth of nostril unusual in similar formations; a finely-moulded chin, speaking, in its want of prominence, of a want of moral energy; hair of a more than web-like softness and tenuity; these features, with an inordinate expansion above the regions of the temple, made up altogether a countenance not easily to be forgotten.
Fouquet had gone to bed, like a man who clings to life, and wishes to economize, as much as possible, that slender tissue of existence, of which the shocks and frictions of this world so quickly wear out the tenuity. D'Artagnan appeared at the door of this chamber, and was saluted by the superintendent with a very affable "Good day."
Presently the sudden transition from daylight to darkness which, owing to the tenuity of the air upon Barsoom, occurs almost without the warning twilight of Earth, would occur.
But its efforts, it must be acknowledged, served an excellent purpose; for, with each successive whiff, the figure lost more and more of its dizzy and perplexing tenuity and seemed to take denser substance.
The tenuity of the passaggio at [F.sub.5] may have rendered it susceptible to disturbance by once the normal flow of hormones, or it might prove idiosyncratic to this investigation; further research is needed to confirm or refute the findings reported in this study.
In astronomy, it was regarded as a fluid of extreme tenuity and mobility, offering no resistance to the motions of the celestial bodies.
(34) He proceeded to describe the political deadlock between Turkey, England, Zionists, and Muslims (he made no reference to Arab Christians), claiming that "any new venture in that ravished land is not only insecure, but will also fail to obtain legalized protection to title to any property that might be purchased under the present hazard." (35) Beyond political instability and the tenuity of property rights, the obstinate mental attitudes of Jews and Arabs precluded "constructive mission work, as no such work can flourish among people whose minds are at war and whose bodies engage in daily riots somewhere in the country." (36)
The Taoism of Clarified Tenuity: Content and Intention
An apocalyptic event has destroyed humanity and terrestrial life; the agent of destruction was a comet on a path that "would bring it into very close proximity with the earth." As the comet drew closer, scholars had reassured the world that comets were "vapory creations of inconceivable tenuity ...
Most have assumed a veneer of Islam but the tenuity of this can be judged by their addiction to illicit brewing and drunkenness.
(6) Absorbent drug is a drug which, due to its tenuity and heat, stirs the fluids as soon as it comes across them at a place ...