tenuousness


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ten·u·ous

 (tĕn′yo͞o-əs)
adj.
1.
a. Weak or insubstantial; flimsy: a tenuous argument; a tenuous link between pieces of evidence.
b. Precarious or insecure: tenuous survival.
2. Long and thin; slender: tenuous strands.
3. Having a thin consistency: Pluto's tenuous envelope of gas.

[Latin tenuis; see ten- in Indo-European roots.]

ten′u·ous·ly adv.
ten′u·ous·ness n.
Translations

tenuousness

[ˈtenjʊəsnɪs] N [of link, connection] → lo vago; [of argument] → endeblez f, falta f de fundamento; [of evidence] → falta f de solidez

tenuousness

n
(lit, of thread) → Dünne f, → Feinheit f; (of cobweb)Zartheit f, → Feinheit f; (of air)Dünne f; (of gas)Flüchtigkeit f
(fig, of connection, argument, relationship) → Schwäche f; (= insecurity of position)Unsicherheit f
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References in periodicals archive ?
The global market in the past few years has grown moderately despite various uncertainties such as the economic slowdown of major economies, negative and positive influence of the low crude oil price, fluctuations in value of US dollars, the high growth rate of the US automotive and construction industry, tenuousness of the recovery of various European nations and developments in regulatory norms globally.
From almost drowning off the coast of England (and then again in Africa) to escaping the clutches of a serial strangler, the book--and O'Farrell's life--is chockablock with scenes highlighting the fragility and tenuousness of life.
One consequence of the multiplicity of belief systems is what Taylor calls fragilization, or the tenuousness of one belief system that may or may not be compatible with other belief systems, all of which are intended to provide the foundation for human flourishing.
But we see the tenuousness of this definition in today's United Kingdom, where being 'European' competes with being 'British' and even being 'Scottish' or 'English' as the people's paramount identity.
The paper circles emphasised that tenuousness and the fragility of earth's resources.
The tenuousness of our countries and societies become evident to those who wish us ill, and view us as easy prey in their plans to redraw our boundaries.
dollar, both the positive and negative impacts of lower oil prices, the tenuousness of the recovery in Europe, the rates of growth of the automotive and construction industries in the United States, and regional regulatory developments.
Since the advent of Islam, non-Muslims or some Muslims who disagree with their rulers developed very sophisticated ways of combating the constant oppression and tenuousness of their lives.
At CCC, the new rating for Greece remains deep in junk-bond territory, reflecting the tenuousness of the 86 billion euro ($96 billion) rescue deal and the need for official debt relief to render Athens's finances sustainable over the medium term.
While it should come as no surprise that different parts of this collection reflect heterogeneity, marked by wide variety of content and of character, as is common to this form, this, and the tenuousness with which some of the contributions are connected with the main theme, present some difficulties.
EDWARD HIRSCH'S POETRY HAS BEEN SENSITIVE TO THE tenuousness of a poet's existence, to the compromises inherent in a typically unprofitable life devoted to art.
Such a process of abstraction and conceptual tenuousness, however, is an expression of bad faith, especially as it avoids the problematic truth that race and racialization are not divorceable from the social integument of lived experience.